Project #16123 - case

·       Read the following two cases and answer the questions that follow.  1 page for each case. single spaced

 

THE END OF THE PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL?

 

As discussed in the textbook, organizations measure employee performance for a variety of reasons, including determining which employees need training, who is performing well enough to earn a performance reward, and who deserves a promotion. Performance appraisal information can also help determine where problems lie in the company’s overall training and selection systems and defend HR decisions such as firings in court.

 

In light of these multiple uses, it might surprise you to learn that some companies are moving away from formal appraisal processes. Business scholar Jeffery Pfeffer describes how HR managers at companies like Apple had to bribe managers to complete assigned reviews with free tickets to San Francisco Giants games, and the head of HR at SAS received cheers from employees when he had a bonfire to burn performance appraisal forms. Clearly, appraisals are not popular with the managers asked to perform them. Pfeffer notes that the subjective nature of these reviews is troubling to many managers, leading employees to spend much of their time ingratiating themselves with the boss rather than doing their jobs. Moreover, appraisals put the focus on individual performance rather than on the performance of whole teams. Research conducted by Globoforce found that more than half the 631 survey respondents believed appraisals did not accurately reflect their performance on the job.

 

So what is the alternative? Zappos now rates employees not on how well they accomplish tasks but rather on how well they embody the company’s core values. This feedback is delivered much more frequently during the year than the traditional annual performance meeting. Nor are the ratings used for disciplinary actions or promotions, though employees who get low scores are invited to take developmental classes to improve the fit between their behavior and the company culture. Apple has also eliminated annual performance reviews as neither timely nor helpful. Other companies have developed performance management software that automates and streamlines a more continuous performance review, allowing employees to track their performance in real time.

 

Questions

1.     Have you ever been through a performance appraisal? Do the reactions to appraisal systems described here match your experience? Why or why not?

 

2.     What are some potential advantages of providing employees with more regular developmental feedback than an annual meeting?

 

3.     Are there potential drawbacks to eliminating conventional performance appraisal systems? What systems would need to be put in place to replace formal appraisals?

 

4.     Would you feel comfortable providing others with performance feedback? What are some of the possible reasons managers often prefer not to give employees critiques of their performance?

 

CREDIT CHECKING

 

Is it unethical—or illegal—for a hiring organization to check an applicant’s credit history? The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) seems to think so. It is suing Kaplan Higher Education Corporation for its use of credit checks, alleging that relying on poor credit histories to reject applicants has adverse impact on minority applicants, with no legitimate purpose justifying its use. Justine Lisser, an EEOC spokesperson, said, “Credit histories were not compiled to show responsibility. They were compiled to show whether or not someone was paying the bills, which is not always the same thing.”

 

In its defense, Kaplan maintained that it typically conducted credit checks: “The checks are job-related and necessary for our organization to ensure that staffing handling financial matters, including financial aid, are properly screened.”

 

A 2011 survey of employers revealed that 21 percent conducted credit checks on all applicants. That was up from 15 percent the year before. Two-thirds conduct credit checks on some applicants, up from 61 percent in 2010.

 

Joey Price, with BL Seamon, thought she had found the perfect candidate for a conference planner position. The candidate was fresh out of college but had experience planning conferences and a good academic record. But when Price found out that the candidate had multiple car repossessions, extremely high credit card bills, and collection agencies after her, she rejected her. “A credit report doesn’t lie,” Price said.

 

Questions

1.     Do you think organizations should be allowed to investigate applicants’ credit histories in the hiring process? Why or why not?

 

 

 

Subject Business
Due By (Pacific Time) 11/06/2013 08:00 am
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