Project #21182 - Film Art

Please compose your answers beneath the questions and print out your exams on paper, to be submitted in our last class.

 

1.  The Term “unrestricted narrative” means that the story is told by an unseen, omniscient narrator.   But as Boardwell & Thompson write: "Narration is never completely unrestricted. There is always something we are not told, even if it is only how the film will end."

 

A.  If a narrative can never be completely “unrestricted” discuss what value, if any, there is in making such a distinction in the first place.

 

 

 

 

 

B.  Hitchcock stated that “One creates interest, drama and suspense, by supplying, rather than withholding, (expository) information and by supplying the right information at the right time.”  Using the storyline of ANY film as an example, discuss whether it proves or disproves Hitchcock’s premise.   Tell also whether the P.O.V. of your film is generally restricted or unrestricted.

 

2.  Answer the following questions:

 

(For full credit, even if the P.O.V.  of  the films listed in this question is generally unrestricted, describe ALL “restricted” elements to the narrative/storyline).  Do not answer any question in “2” using a film that you used to answer Question “1”.

 

A.  In these restricted/unrestricted terms categorize Fred Zinneman’s “High Noon”  Explain your answer.

 

B.   In these terms is Hitchcock’s “Psycho” (1960) restricted or unrestricted?  Explain your answer.

 

C.  Similarly categorize ANY detective, or mystery, film storyline/ P.O.V.  Discuss particulars of the film storyline to support your answer.

 

(Similarly categorize any 3 of the following films (D-L)

 

D.  Hitchcock’s “North By Northwest” (1959)

 

E.   Christopher Nolan’s “The Prestige” (2006)

 

F.   Charles Laughton’s  “The Night Of The Hunter” (1954)

 

G.   Orson Welles’s “Citizen Kane” (1941)

 

H.    Victor Fleming’s “The Wizard Of Oz” (1939)

 

I.    Michael Curtiz’s “Casablanca” (1941)

 

J.  Murnau’s “Nosferatu”  (1922)

 

K.  Wiene’s “The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari” (1919)

 

L.  Paul Haggis’s “Crash” (2004)

 

M.  In what type, or genre, of film is one most likely to find the most unrestricted storyline/P.O.V.?  Explain your answer and give at least one film as your example.

 

3.  Define the characteristics of  (“straight”) “dramatic” versus “melodramatic” film/storylines.  Up to 10 points

 

4.  Identify the:

 

A.  (“Straight”) “character drama” genres.  

 

B.   “Melodramatic” genres.   

 

5.  Define the term “Mixed Genre(s)” and explain why a film/storyline of your choice exhibits such a characteristic and succeeds or fails as a result of “Mixing Genres.”  

 

6.    For more than a decade a particular style, or “grammar,” has been used in film editing.  Its manifestations are often characterized as “shotgun editing”, “ramping”, etc.  The idea seems to be that quick, episodic, accelerated pace of cutting introduces “tension” or “interest” points in the film.  It is most often used in action oriented storylines, such as horror films.  But one sees this style in contemporary television program cutting, as well.

 

A.   Do you agree or disagree with the above premise, namely that, BY ITSELF, such “shotgun cutting” introduces real “tension” into the film, even if the “tension/interest” is not apparent from the actual performances?  If you agree, discuss a film example.  If you disagree, discuss a film example in which such a technique either detracts from or contributes nothing to the film impact.  Explain your answer in either case.  

 

B.   Using ANY film as an example, discuss in detail how the editing overall enhanced the impact of the film.   [Note: “Casablanca” (1941) has often been pointed to by commentators as a film “saved” by the editing.]

 

7.  Explain the  180-degree rule.  For what dynamic/aesthetic reasons do we have such a rule?

 

 

8.  What is meant by the evolution of cinematography from the Western painting tradition?

 

9.  Explain what Aristotle means by “recognition/reversal.”

 

10.  In the waiting for Frank Miller sequence from the film High Noon (1952) explain how and to what extent each of the styles we have studied in the course (cinematography, editing, sound and the musical score) contribute to an overall impact, effect or form to the film. 

 

11.  As applied to the scoring of a film, what does the term “Mickey Mousing” signify?

 

12.   To what artistic movement do the story and film styles/techniques used in “The Night Of The Hunter” (1954) best relate or embody?

 

13.   In “The City” (1939) the message of the film appears to be that American cities were decayed and the conditions inhuman, that the solution lay in completely redesigning cities as picturesque communities surrounded by countryside, where everyone can walk or bicycle to school and work.  Does the  film adequately support the message or not?  Discuss.

 

14.    Why do you think almost all motion pictures from the beginning (certainly of the feature film) were/are accompanied by music?

 

15.     Classify the 1943 film, “The Ox-Bow Incident,” as to genre and to the extent it is an example of character drama or melodrama.  Comment on the styles/techniques used in the film, quality of script, acting and direction.  Lastly, do you think this film is or is not “film noir”?

 

Subject Art
Due By (Pacific Time) 01/20/2014 09:00 pm
Report DMCA
TutorRating
pallavi

Chat Now!

out of 1971 reviews
More..
amosmm

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
PhyzKyd

Chat Now!

out of 1164 reviews
More..
rajdeep77

Chat Now!

out of 721 reviews
More..
sctys

Chat Now!

out of 1600 reviews
More..
sharadgreen

Chat Now!

out of 770 reviews
More..
topnotcher

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
XXXIAO

Chat Now!

out of 680 reviews
More..
All Rights Reserved. Copyright by AceMyHW.com - Copyright Policy