Project #23095 - How presidentially declared national emergencies and natural disasters from 1900-Present have shaped US Federal government emerg

Please see attached PDF and Word Document for complete details. The below is a paste from the word document.

Level: Master degree

 

Type of Course: Emergency Management and Public Law

 

Type of Paper: Research Paper

 

Due Date: Thursday, 26 February 2014, by 8 am Mountain Standard Time (MST)

 

Subject: How presidentially declared national emergencies and natural disasters from 1900-Present have shaped US Federal government emergency and disaster management policy

 

Paper Objective: The goal of this paper is to find out how disasters shaped emergency and disaster management policy and public laws since from beginning of the 1900’s to present. Historical, presidentially declared natural disasters and national emergencies in the United States will be researched. The paper will discuss the policies that were in place prior to the emergencies and disasters, how those policies affected emergency operations during the disasters, and what new national policies and laws were passed after the disaster because of problems with the policies that were in place at the time of the disaster. This research paper will determine how national policy was shaped, and what new policies came into effect, after the disasters took place to streamline emergency response operations. Including information about how federal policies emergency response at the State Government level. Discuss if the new policies that came into effect, actually worked when another disaster happened. Disasters often shape Federal Government policy due to problems experienced during emergency operations. This paper will explore how emergencies and disasters created major milestones in US national Emergency Management policy. The focus of this paper is on national policy at the Federal Government level. Internet research and peer reviewed resources will be used to learn more about how natural disasters shaped American policy. It would be wise to use sources from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the National Guard, and other emergency management related sources. When you get to the stage of more recent events, discussing the Stafford Act, Hurricane Katrina, the Post Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act (PKEMRA), Hurricane Sandy, and the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act (SRIA) would be appreciated.

 

Additional Paper Requirements:

 

  1. Paper length: 19 pages in length for content

  2. Abstract length: 1 page. The content on this page just needs to be a solid paragraph and does not need to take up the entire page.

  3. In text citations: 1 APA style in text citation per paragraph with a matching reference in the reference section. No in text citation in the abstract necessary.

  4. Reference section: These pages do not count towards the 20 total pages (paper length + abstract length)

  5. Must be an original paper, no plagiarism, and achieve a Turnitin plagiarism score of less than 20%

  6. Paper must be written in MS Word, 12 point, times new roman font, double spaced

  7. Please use abbreviations after spelling out the first name. For example, the first time you use Department of Defense (DoD), you would use DoD the rest of the paper. After you type out Department of Homeland Security (DHS), you would use DHS the rest of the paper.

  8. Please include headings and sub-headings, and follow the format as closely as possible as the PDF attachment titled “Sample APA Paper”. Please do not put “tables” or “lists” in the document either.

  9. See attached PDF for a sample layout of how the paper should be formatted.

 

 

 

Sources are listed in alphabetical order by last name of first author. Regardless of what the PDF says, this is how the reference page should look. Example of a reference page with ½ inch hanging line spacing, and double spaced.

 

Example References

 

Faust, K. L., & Carlson, S. M. (2011). Devastation in the aftermath of hurricane katrina as a state crime: Social audience reactions. Crime, Law and Social Change, 55(1), 33-51. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10611-011-9268-7

 

FEMA. (2011). FEMA Strategic Plan Fiscal Years 2011-2014. Retrieved fromwww.fema.gov/pdf/about/

 

 

 

Subject Law
Due By (Pacific Time) 02/26/2014 08:00 am
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