Project #31932 - 3 Part assignment

Part 1. Most style guides are organized in similar fashion, with a directory of common models to consult as you create a references list. Understanding how to use this directory is crucial to being able to create a references list in the correct style. The first point to understand is that the directory of models is organized according to the category of source (book, periodical, etc.). So you must first decide which category to look in, and then look for the best model to follow in that category. That said, sometimes you will have to combine information from two or more models to get the correct citation.


Read A Pocket Style Manual (Hacker & Sommers) page 106. Examine the Directory to APA reference list models on pages 107-108 and choose an example. Go to the corresponding listing among the examples starting on page 108. Read the entire listing, including any extra information. Do this until you understand how the Directory works.

Forum: 5.1 - APA References Exercise
Now complete this exercise and post it in the 5.1 - APA References Exercise forum. See attached document

 

Part2. A documentation style has two parts: the list of references and the in-text citation. These two must work hand-in-hand. The primary objective of an in-text citation is to provide enough information so that the reader can go to the list of references and find the source.


How does this work? When you look for a source in the list of references, you (and anyone else who is reading your work, like, say, your Instructor) will look only at the first piece of information in each listing on the references list. That means that the in-text citation must always include the first piece of information about that source in the list of references. Usually, this is the author's name. Other information may be included as appropriate for a smooth sentence flow and possibly to increase the persuasive power of your argument, but you must always include that first piece of information that will be found in the references listing for that source.

Read page 101 (Hacker & Sommers). Examine the Directory to APA in-text citation models and choose an example. Go to the corresponding listing among the examples on page 101. Read the entire listing, including any extra information. Do this until you understand how the Directory works.

Forum: 5.2 - APA In-Text Citation Exercise
A documentation style has two parts: the list of references and the in-text citation. These two must work hand-in-hand. The primary objective of an in-text citation is to provide enough information so that the reader can go to the list of references and find the source.

How does this work? When you look for a source in the list of references, you (and anyone else who is reading your work, like, say, your Instructor) will look only at the first piece of information in each listing on the references list. That means that the in-text citation must always include the first piece of information about that source in the list of references. Usually, this is the author's name. Other information may be included as appropriate for a smooth sentence flow and possibly to increase the persuasive power of your argument, but you must always include that first piece of information that will be found in the references listing for that source.

Read page 101 (Hacker & Sommers). Examine the Directory to APA in-text citation models and choose an example. Go to the corresponding listing among the examples on page 101. Read the entire listing, including any extra information. Do this until you understand how the Directory works.

Forum: 5.2 - APA In-Text Citation Exercise
Now complete this exercise and post it in the 5.2 - APA: In-Text Citation Exercise forum. Please see attachement

 

Part3. Plagiarism is using someone else's words or ideas without giving credit. Most people understand that quoting word-for-word without using quotation marks or naming the source is plagiarizing, but many people do not know that plagiarism can occur even when writers put ideas into their own words, if those ideas were lifted from a source and not credited. And very few people understand how to avoid close paraphrasing, another form of plagiarism.


Read page 25, section 6c, and study the chart on pages 26-27; then read pages 29-37 (Hacker & Sommers). Please see attachement

Forum: 5.3 - Plagiarism Quiz
Plagiarism is using someone else's words or ideas without giving credit. Most people understand that quoting word-for-word without using quotation marks or naming the source is plagiarizing, but many people do not know that plagiarism can occur even when writers put ideas into their own words, if those ideas were lifted from a source and not credited. And very few people understand how to avoid close paraphrasing, another form of plagiarism.

Read page 25, section 6c, and study the chart on pages 26-27; then read pages 29-37 (Hacker & Sommers).

Now complete this quiz and post it in the 5.3 - Plagiarism Quiz forum.

Plase see attachement

 

Subject English
Due By (Pacific Time) 05/29/2014 12:00 pm
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