Project #3232 - Paper essay

(I would like to use the book Pride and prejudice but any of the listed books will be ok )
.pride and prejudice
.jane eyre
.age of innocence
.beloved
 
at the bottom my teacher sent us ideas of topics:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Full Name
 
Wahhaj
 
English 2341 Section 1101
 
Date
Paper 1 Short Critical Analysis (Create an Informative Title)
 
·         FIVE pages in print. MLA format.
·         ONE primary source and THREE secondary scholarly sources in print.
·         Submit a file to ANGEL. 
 
The audience is people who have already read the text you choose to analyze. Your task is to discuss your own perception or observations about the story. The analysis must enlighten them with your understanding of the plot, characters, setting, point of view, or irony, and it should argue and support how one or more of these elements relate to your focused perception of the story. The introduction could start with what most audience members see at the first reading (such as a reference to other scholarly articles), and it could lead to a thesis that points out a new detail or perspective that the analysis will reveal.
 
Use a novel that the class has discussed. Read and re-read it. Freewrite, list, or cluster on an interpretation that most readers do not notice at first. The interpretation may extend an idea from response journals. Narrow the interpretation to one thesis of a specific passage, character, image, point of view, or ironic moment. It should address an arguable interpretation and take a strong stand on it. Find a scholarly article that supports the interpretation to quote or paraphrase, and/or find a scholarly article that opposes the interpretation to refute. Incorporate an idea from the article into your essay. This essay requires you incorporate one scholarly article.
 
With analysis of fiction, the essay must make an argument of interpretation inthird-person that will lead your reader to accept the conclusion. Third-person moves the paper beyond response and opinion to analysis. Unlike first-person opinion, third-person voice is consistent and analytical, and it calls for supporting evidence. Interpretation of the story should be in present tense, e.g. “The story says . . .” “Readers see . . .” “the character wants . . .”  Literary analysis requires present tense because literature is alive and in the moment.
 
To present an interesting argument, analysis should interpret rather than state facts. The interpretation should be contestable. For instance, it should not just argue the thesis that restates a general summary: “Alice Walker’s ‘Everyday Use’ describes characters vividly in order to illustrate the family.” Rather, come up with a point that stirs discussion, perhaps one person may disagree. In Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use,” the characterization and plot criticize the preferential treatment parents give to the beautiful child. This argument should appear in the introduction, along with a plan of how the essay will support the point. The text criticizes Mama for her unjust treatment of her daughters when Mama compares Maggie and Dee, when Mama describes herself, and when Mama experiences a revelation. The thesis should be clear, strong, meaningful, and specific. The introduction should present it and the structure of the essay.
A good analysis shows understanding in an organized, logical manner. It organizes the body paragraphs according to the thesis and plan in the introduction. The textbook says to “decide upon a thesis and include only the relevant insights” (Kennedy and Gioia 1923).  The body paragraphs start with a topic sentence that relates to the thesis. Supporting sentences include paraphrases or quotes that prove the topic sentence. The paragraph should begin with a topic sentence and end with a final word about the how the paragraph topic relates to the essay thesis:
The text reveals Mama’s parenting as unfair and cruel as Mama behaves negatively toward her less-attractive daughter, Maggie. Mama compares Maggie to a dog, making Maggie look foolish and pathetic, “Have you ever seen a lame animal, perhaps a dog run over by some careless person rich enough to own a car, sidle up to someone who is ignorant enough to be kind to him? That is the way my Maggie walks” (Walker 174). Mama does not see her daughter’s attitude as friendly and forgiving. Mama sees her daughter as gullible and damaged. Mama seems silent about her negativity, but her silence has its own cruelty. When Maggie asks Mama for reassurance about her appearance, “How do I look, Mama?” (Walker 174), Mama does not encourage her insecure daughter. Mama’s response to Maggie’s question is only, “Come out into the yard” (Walker 174). Upon analysis, Mama’s words and attitude sound distasteful for a mother describing her child. A close look at the text reveals Mama as a misguided and misguiding mother. Mama expresses a cold attitude toward Maggie, and Dee learns to express the same cold attitude toward Maggie.  Like Mama, Dee shows little regard or respect for Maggie as Mama tells Dee the quilts are supposed to go to Maggie:
She gasped like a bee had stung her.
“Maggie can't appreciate these quilts!” she said. “She'd probably be backward enough to put them to everyday use."
“I reckon she would,” I said. "God knows I been saving 'em for long enough with nobody using 'em. I hope she will!" I didn't want to bring up how I had offered Dee (Wangero) a quilt when she went away to college. Then she had told they were old~fashioned, out of style.
“But they'repriceless!” she was saying now, furiously; for she has a temper. “Maggie would put them on the bed and in five years they'd be in rags. Less than that!” (Walker 180)
Dee expresses assuredly to Mama that giving the quilts to Maggie wastes their quality, demonstrating that Dee feels Mama agrees that Maggie is unworthy. When Maggie agrees with Dee, Mama finally sees she has behaved cruelly. The text argues that Mama’s lifelong negative behavior towards Maggie shows coldness, creates problems, and needs change.
A paragraph of an opposing idea may be included, and the analysis should present critical arguments to this opposing idea:  Some readers would argue that Mama is not unfairly cruel but only realistic. However, Mama knows how to see her own imperfections as positive. For Maggie’s imperfections, Mama does not find the positive. The paragraph should voice the opposition and then offer a rebuttal that supports the thesis.
Paragraphs and the conclusion should stick to the thesis. The conclusion should recap the ideas of the body, and it should return to the structure of the introduction. If the introduction poses a question, the conclusion should answer the question. If the introduction presents a broad topic, then the body narrows it with the argument, the conclusion should broaden the topic again. It should bring a sense of completeness to the details. A good conclusion helps the reader move from the parts back to the big picture. It may illustrate the larger principle that the story promotes:  By presenting an objectionable character who favors her beautiful child, Walker’s story criticizes the practice of giving children preferential treatment based on beauty.  Develop your conclusion to be the same size as one of the body paragraphs. Readers should remember the thesis by the end of the essay. 
Use the story and one secondary scholarly source.
Use proper MLA citation: 
1)      In the essay, use Parenthetical Citation:
a)      For short quotes of 1-4 lines: The criticism of how parents treat children with physical flaws may have roots in Walker’s own experience:  “The author was herself a disfigured child, an eye having been shot out with a BB gun” (Cowart).
b)      For long quotes of more than 4 lines, see the block example on page 2.
i)        Start the quotation on a new line
ii)       Indent entire quote one inch from the left margin
iii)     Maintain double-spacing.
iv)     If you are citing multiple paragraphs, only indent the first line of the quotation by a half inch.
2)      Write parenthetical citation after the closing punctuation mark.
3)      For a back page, write an alphabetical Works Cited page:
 
Works Cited
 
Cowart, David. “Heritage and Deracination in Walker's ‘Everyday Use.’” Studies in Short Fiction 33.2 (1996): 171-. Literature Resource Center. Web. 29 April 2002.
Walker, Alice. “Everyday Use.” Perrine’s Literature:  Structure, Sound, and Sense. Eds. Thomas Arp and Gregory Johnson. 8th ed. New York:  Heinle & Heinle, 2002. 173-181. Print.
CHECKLIST FOR EVERY ESSAY:
Typed or printed on one side of each page
One-inch margins
Left Align only
Double-spaced
Paragraph spacing is 0 (zero) before and after each paragraph
Times New Roman 12
Numbered pages in the top-right corner, .5” from the top. (Click the top margin twice, Page Number, Top of page, Plain Number 3, Type your last name [space])
Standard MLA page one:  your name, instructor, course, date, and the title arranged just like the name block and topic title on page one of this assignment sheet: (double-spaced)
Centered title with no bold, title case, same font.
Paragraph indent .5”
Stapled.
The following Literature Criticism Introduction will help familiarize you with difference schools of criticism and help you choose one as your model, if you so choose.
 
Ideas of topics:
 
1)      The transformative power of the imagination in Jane Eyre.
2)      Men as property and women as active agents who snap men up as property to use and mobilize this source of power.
3)      Online questions about Age of Innocence: Do Newland Archer's character flaws ultimately prevent him from having a relationship with Ellen Olenska? Or was the relationship, weighed down by New York moral codes doomed before it even began?
Is this truly an age of innocence, according to Wharton? If the age itself isn't innocent, were there certain people within New York society who were innocent? In what ways were they innocent?
Is The Age of Innocence a tragedy? Why or why not?
Wharton has often been criticized for making her male protagonists into weak, spineless creatures, dominated by the values and morals of upper class women. In what ways is the New York society of the novel a woman's world?
How does Archer's view of his wife May change throughout the course of the novel?
Describe the differences between Newland's outlook on society and Ellen's. What do their views have in common? On what grounds do they differ?
Why does Old New York fear European culture?
4)      Compare the sources of female power and strategies for obtaining power or relationship to power in Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Age of Innocence.
5)      How does slavery affect the mother daughter relationship and what is the effect of separation of mother from her child inBeloved?
6)      How the repression of the memory of slavery cause a fragmentation of the self and a true loss of identity in Alice Walker and Toni Morrison’s stories?
 

Subject English
Due By (Pacific Time) 03/16/2013 03:00 am
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