Project #33830 - For Lecturer

Following are the extracts you are asked to analyze on the final examination. You will be asked to demonstrate how they are related to each other and furthermore to the Romanticism in general. Based upon three chosen passages below, examine in what why the texts are similar and/or in what way they are different. Think about the way they deploy the Romantic idiom and why?  Compare, synthesize, and contrasts the three texts.   How do they express the borderline mental experiences, 'in your mind,' as we have discussed online. Please submit the exam via email by the end of Tuesday, June 24. It should be between 3 and 4 pages in length.

 

 

 

General suggestions: think about what the three passages have in common. Use the text by Sigmund Freud and a guide: the idea of the double (doubling of consciousness), self-destruction, egoism, the ‘ language’ of dreams (i.e., the notion that literature is a form of dreaming), narcissism (i.e. intense introspection), the idea of death. As you know, these are essential characteristics of Romanticism. Remember, there is not a right answer. I am asking that you explore possible connections and ways of looking at and understanding these brief passages in a essay exam of between 3 and 4 pages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polidari:

"He watched him; and the very impossibility of forming an idea of the character of a man entirelyabsorbed in himself, who gave few other signs of his observation of external objects, than the tacit assent to their existence, implied by the avoidance of their contact: allowing his imagination to picture everything that flattered its propensity to extravagant ideas, he soon formed this object into the hero of a romance, and determined to observe the offspring of his fancy, rather than the
person before him. He became acquainted with him, paid him attentions, and so far advanced upon his notice, that his presence was always recognized. He gradually learnt that Lord Ruthven's affairs were embarrassed, and soon found, from the notes of preparation in ——Street, that he was about to travel. Desirous of gaining some information respecting this singularcharacter, who, till now, had only whetted his curiosity, he hinted to his guardians, that it wastime for him to perform the tour, which for many generations has been thought necessary toenable the young to take some rapid steps in the career of vice towards putting themselves uponan equality with the aged, and not allowing them to appear as if fallen from the skies, whenever
scandalous intrigues are mentioned as the subjects of pleasantry or of praise, according to the degree of skill shewn in carrying them on. They consented: and Aubrey immediately mentioning his intentions to Lord Ruthven, was surprised to receive from him a proposal to join him. Flattered by such a mark of esteem from him, who, apparently, had nothing in common with other men, he gladly accepted it, and in a few days they had passed the circling waters.

 

 

 

 

 

Gautier:

 

 

 

My love, although the growth of a single hour, had taken imperishable root. I did not even dream of attempting to tear it up, so fully was I convinced such a thing would be impossible. That woman had completely taken possession of me. One look from her had sufficed to change my very nature. She had breathed her will into my life, and I no longer lived in myself, but in her and for her. I gave myself up to a thousand extravagancies. I kissed the place upon my hand which she had touched, and I repeated her name over and over again for hours in succession. I only needed to close my eyes in order to see her distinctly as though she were actually present; and I reiterated to myself the words she had uttered in my ear at the church porch: 'Unhappy man! Unhappy man! What hast thou done?' I comprehended at last the full horror of my situation, and the funereal and awful restraints of the state into which I had just entered became clearly revealed to me. To be a priest!—that is, to be chaste, to never love, to observe no distinction of sex or age, to turn from the sight of all beauty, to put out one's own eyes, to hide for ever crouching in the chill shadows of some church or cloister, to visit none but the dying, to watch by unknown corpses, and ever bear about with one the black soutane as a garb of mourning for oneself, so that your very dress might serve as a pall for your coffin.

 

 

 

Poe:

 

 

 

 

 

He admitted, however, although with hesitation, that much of the peculiar gloom which thus afflicted him could be traced to a more natural and far more palpable origin—t o the severe and long-continued illness—indeed to the evidently approaching dissolution—of a tenderly beloved sister, his sole companion for long years, his last and only relative on earth. “Her decease,” he said, with a bitterness which I can never forget, “would leave him (him the hopeless and the frail) the last of the ancient race of the Ushers.” While he spoke, the lady Madeline (for so was

 

she called) passed slowly through a remote portion of the apartment, and, without having noticed my presence, disappeared. I regarded her with an utter astonishment not unmingled with dread; and yet I found it impossible to account for such feelings. A sensation of stupor oppressed me as my eyes followed her retreating steps. When a door, at length, closed upon her, my glance sought

 

instinctively and eagerly the countenance of the brother; but he had buried his face in his hands, and I could only perceive that a far more than ordinary wanness had overspread the emaciated fingers through which trickled many passionate tears.

 

 

 

 

 

Freud:

 

 

 

“ The theme of the ‘double’ has been very thoroughly treated by Otto Rank (1914). He has gone into the connections which the ‘double’ has with reflections in mirrors, with shadows, withguardian spirits, with the belief in the soul and with the fear of death; but he also lets in a flood of light on the surprising evolution of the idea. For the ‘double’ was originally an insurance against the destruction of the ego, an ‘energetic denial of the power of death’, as Rank says; and probably the ‘immortal’ soul was the first ‘double’ of the body. This invention of doubling as a

 

preservation against extinction has its counterpart in the language of dreams, which is found of representing castration by a doubling or multiplication of a genital symbol. The same desire led the Ancient Egyptians to develop the art of making images of the dead in lasting materials. Such ideas, however, have sprung from the soil of unbounded self-love, from the primary narcissism which dominates the mind of the child and of primitive man. But when this stage has been surmounted, the ‘double’ reverses its aspect. From having been an assurance of immortality, it

 

becomes the uncanny harbinger of death.”

 

 

 

 

 

Subject English
Due By (Pacific Time) 06/23/2014 08:00 pm
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