Project #33838 - Need Done ASAP!!!!

Answer these questions-

 

-In Does the Center Hold?, Palmer cites Sigmund Freud and B.F. Skinner as examples of Hard Determinists. Both thought that the science of Psychology ruled out free will. Why exactly did they think so? Do you think either of them was right? What do you make of the arguments - as presented by Palmer - that these two psychologists gave? Is Hard Determinism true? I think those of you who are Psychology Majors should find this issue particularly challenging.

 

-Here are two more philosophical dilemmas involving the implications of the debate about free will for Philosophy of Religion. First, many people believe that there is a Heaven and a Hell and that after we die God will judge us based on what we did while alive, and either reward us by sending us to Heaven or punish us by sending us to Hell. If this belief about the afterlife is true, then would it be just and fair on God’s part to punish or reward us if Hard Determinism is true? Would it be just on God’s part if Soft Determinism is true?

 

The second dilemma has to do with whether or not God is free. Can God deliberate about what he is going to do? If you say yes, then, so the argument goes, that conflicts with God’s omniscience, since you can’t deliberate about what you know in advance is going to happen. On the other hand, if you say no, that seems to conflict with God’s omnipotence (his ability to do anything). So what do you want to say about whether or not God is free?

 

This Unit asks you to consider arguments for and against the belief that we human beings possess souls or minds or spirits distinct from our physical bodies. Do you think we are purely physical mechanisms - just our bodies - or do you think souls or spirits (non-physical substances) exist? What do you make of the question whether animals other than humans have souls? Do the arguments that support human souls also support animal ones? Why or why not? Please do not respond to these questions by saying, "I believe X because this is what my reiligion says, and I believe my religion." This may in fact be why you believe what you do, but in Philosophy it is an Appeal to Authority. It doesn't really give us the grounds or justification or reason why the belief is true. It's like when you asked your parents why you had to do something and they responded, "Because I said so." (Or vice versa if you are now in the position of being the parent). So what do you think - are there grounds for believing in a soul (or not) independent of the appeal to the authority of one's religion?

Subject Philosophy
Due By (Pacific Time) 06/22/2014 12:00 am
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