Project #39872 - English Analysis Rough Draft

SKIM THROUGH EVERYTHING YOU MAY SKIM THROUGH THE CHAPTERS TO GET THE IDEA OF THE PROMPT. PLEASE GIVE ME A ROUGH DRAFT. I WILL PROVIDE SCREENSHOTS OF THE BOOK YOU CAN ZOOM THROUGH.

 

II. WRITING (by Sunday)

Follow these instructions carefully.  This third week you write a first draft.

  1. Format.  Your analysis will be in MLA format:  no cover page; your last name and the page number appear as a running header in the upper right hand corner; in the upper left hand corner is your heading (NOT a running header), going down:  Your Names / Date / / Analyze "Order"; font is Times New Roman, size 12; double-space all; standard 1" margins; your original title should be centered below your heading, above your intro paragraph.  The length will be 3.5 pages minimum.
  2. Organization.  Your analysis will have a beginning, middle, and end.  The Intro will give an overview of the article; it will conclude with a thesis sentence.  Transitions must help smooth the change from section to section.  Body paragraphs should have topic sentences--main ideas.
  3. Content.  The body paragraphs will examine the various rankings in order.  Quote from the article.  After quoting, put the page number where you found the quotation in parenthesis, e.g.  Gladwell writes, "The final tally now looks like this" (3).
  4. Mechanics.  Proofread by reading aloud.  Your essay's grammar, punctuation, syntax, and spelling will be correct. 
  5. Composition standards for your consideration:  a) Put the page number at the end of the quotation in parenthesis:  "Like this" (3).  When only one source, you don't need to write the author.  b)  Header goes in upper rt corner--it is just your last name and the page number of your essay.  c) Paragraphs are built basically in this order:  transition; topic sentence; argument 1; relevant quotation; analysis; commentary.  d) Your explicit thesis sentence must go at the end of your introduction.  The thesis states your essay's purpose.  Ex:  This essay examines the logic and rhetoric Gladwell uses in his critique of popular rankings.  e)  Italicize names of magazines; " " around titles of articles.  f)  You must integrate rhetorical terms from our book by Jay Heinrichs (JH).  g)   Use college-level diction/vocabulary--avoid slang.  h)  You may use "I" but do so sparingly.  i)  In a list, use commas thus:  item x, item y, and item z.  j)  A Works Cited section is not required, considering there's only one source, but it's good practice.  k)  Avoid generalizations and such terms as "always" and "never" and "throughout the history of time."  l)  Write simply, clearly, in a logical progression from point to point.  Clear writing is especially important when you tackle complex subjects.
  6. PROMPT:  Discuss how Gladwell critiques each set of rankings (cars, undergraduate colleges, suicides, law schools, influential regions).  Consider both his logic and his rhetoric (his use of language).  When possible, apply the terms and concepts we've studied so far in the textbook and in my h.o.
  7. Please understand that you are not writing a summary of "The Order of Things."  You are writing an analysis of the language Gladwell uses in his article.  Do not focus on the rankings themselves!  Instead, emphasize MG's writing style--how does he try to persuade us?  
  8. Tip:  Print the article. Take a red pen.  Dissect the article with it.  Look for moments when MG is trying to persuade us readers.  
  9. Write clear, simple prose.  Use only 1-2 quotations per body paragraph.  They don't need to be long, but they should be very well chosen to exemplify your point about MG's rhetoric.  When it comes to quotations, more precise and manageable is better than sprawling.  Be sure you follow up on the quotation with close analysis of it.
  10. Again:  Your essay is about MG's methods of persuasion, NOT about the rankings themselves!
  11. See the Rubric below showing how your essay will be graded.

--Essay 1 Rubric
/2 Format:  MLA style; margins, spacing, font, header, title
/2 Organization:  intro + thesis, body, conclusion; topic sentences, transitions
/2 Mechanics:  grammar, punctuation, syntax, spelling
/4 Argumentation:  integration of quotations, depth of thought, logic, rhetorical terms
/10 TOTAL

Additional notes.  Please read these carefully, and double-check your first draft!
*Attention to detail is crucial.  Aim for no typos.
*Read your essay aloud.
*Clarity and forcefulness are equally important.  If your sentences are long and winding then shorten them.  Make reading easy on the reader.
*When writing a series of items in a list:  ___, ___, and ___.  You must use a comma after each item!
*When quoting, as stated above:  "Yadda yadda yadda" (2).  The period goes at the end, after the page number.
*In 102, aim for analysis, not just summary.
*The heading goes in the upper left corner of the first page only (name / date / class / assignment); the header goes in the upper right corner of each page (Last name, page #).
*Make sure you use several rhetorical terms from textbook.
*Indent each paragraph.
*When you write the name of an article, put it in quotations ("Article Title"); use italics for the name of a magazine, book, etc.
*Mr. Davis can not correct each error in all your essays; rather, he will correct selected ones (for example, on comma usage), then you are expected to apply that logic to all other similar occasions.
*Read the sample essay.  It has strengths and weaknesses from which you may profit.  

Subject English
Due By (Pacific Time) 09/14/2014 12:00 pm
Report DMCA
TutorRating
pallavi

Chat Now!

out of 1971 reviews
More..
amosmm

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
PhyzKyd

Chat Now!

out of 1164 reviews
More..
rajdeep77

Chat Now!

out of 721 reviews
More..
sctys

Chat Now!

out of 1600 reviews
More..
sharadgreen

Chat Now!

out of 770 reviews
More..
topnotcher

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
XXXIAO

Chat Now!

out of 680 reviews
More..
All Rights Reserved. Copyright by AceMyHW.com - Copyright Policy