Project #42796 - SMART goals

Personal Development Goals

Overview: You will prepare a plan and sign a contract with yourself stating how you intend to achieve the student success skills you need to be successful in college and beyond. Based on your assessments, journal assignments, professor feedback, your experience, and self-knowledge, determine the four areas in which you wish to make positive changes and then setSMART goals for accomplishing those changes over the remaining weeks of this session.

Developing quality goals and plans takes time. Reflect on your assessments; talk with professors, family members, and other related people; think through logical plans for accomplishing your goals. You should start your plan this week, but it is not due until the end of Week 6. Place your completed assignment in the Week 6 Personal Development Goals Dropbox.

Focus: The development goals relate specifically to what you have learned about yourself and your skills so far in this class and what you will do about it in the next weeks and months.Each of your four goals must be related to success skills evaluated in the self-assessments. Please note that your goals should not include long-term academic or career goals (such as "Graduate in 2 years.").

For example, one goal could relate to improving your reading speed in response to your reading rate assessment, another could be about reducing procrastination based on the time management tool, a third might focus on improving your social skills as suggested by the Personality Assessment Profile, and a fourth may relate to improving your attitude about school based on your CSI results.

Instructions: Choose four areas in which you would like to make positive changes, and then use the Personal Development Goals Worksheet to list the areas for improvement, provide rationale for making a positive change, and develop your SMART goals and specific plans to achieve those goals. (The worksheet is also available in Doc Sharing under Week 4.)

As you develop your SMART goals, be sure each goal contains Specific behaviors that are observable and can be Measured. Each goal should be Appropriate and Achievable for you personally. You should also be sure the goals are Action-oriented and Agreed on by all involved people. The goals should be Relevant and Realistic to your actual needs. Finally, they should also have Time limits.

For example, to include the time element, you might write: “Every Saturday afternoon, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., I will….” Alternatively, your SMART goal might contain a goal time, such as, “I will buy myself a daily planner by this Saturday at noon so I can write in all my assignments for the term before 2 p.m." Further details on SMART goals are provided below.

Once you've composed your four SMART goals and plans for each, you should make a commitment to your plan by signing the statement of intent at the bottom of the worksheet. You can type your signature for the Development Goals you turn in to the Dropbox, but you should print out and actually sign a copy for yourself and hang it in a visible place in your home where you can refer to it often.

An Explanation of SMART Goals

Specific—What precisely do you want to accomplish? It is hard to know how to proceed if your goal is too vague. Include detail about who, what, where, why, when, and how.

Measurable—Include detail by which you can tell whether you have made progress or achieved your goal. Think about how much, how many, or how well as they relate to your goal.

Agreed—Everyone impacted by your goal and plan to achieve it must be onboard and supportive. Other words that apply here: Action-oriented, Appropriate, and Achievable.

Realistic—Though you want to stretch beyond your comfort zone, your goal should still be realistic and Relevant to your situation. Do you have control over the things required to make this change? Can you do all that is necessary to achieve the goal?

Time-Bound—We all procrastinate to some degree. If you are really going somewhere, you should have an estimated time of arrival. By what date will you get there? What milestones will you pass along the way and when should you reach them? Is there a “how often” element to your goal?

Also consider (SMARTER):

Ethical—Does your goal fit with your values? You will be more motivated to accomplish something if it is morally good and you don’t feel guilty doing it. Stick to your own high standards.

Resourced—Do you have the resources to get the job done? Consider what you will need and whether it is time or money or help from others. If you don’t have what you need, how will you get it?

Subject General
Due By (Pacific Time) 10/10/2014 07:00 pm
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