Project #43648 - NA

I need 1each 250 word responses from each of the labeled responses below. No format needed.

Question 1

Gang members activities affect a rang of people.  It affects the person they victimize, it affects themselves, and it affects the people they are around.  According to the book there is  strong correlation being a gang member and a victim of a crime (Miller, 2001).  I agree with their statement to a point.  I believe everyone in there life is a victim of a crime at one point. The extent of the crime and the affect it has on the person has to do with the crime itself.  Not all crime is the same and not all crime affects people the same.  When a person is affected by a financial crime like identity theft, they take certain security measures after that to prevent being a victim of that crime again.  This can be said for a gang member who was jumped by a bunch of guys from a gang.  That victim may want to reach out for protection from getting assaulted again. Gangs offer that sense of security.  

     There are many reason why people join a gang.  One would be for security from other gangs that have victimized them before.  People are usually a product of their environment.  If a person grew up in a rough neighborhood where they saw people get beat up or shot all the time, this would lead them to believe that behavior is normal.  This happens a lot dealing with younger people growing up in these areas.  Especially if they have older brothers or even their father involved in gang activities.  for example, more than one-third had the experience of losing come close to them from a homicide (Freemon, 2004).  Having someone close to you would have a major impact on how you view people and even the police for that matter.  

     Gangs offer more than security from other gang members.  They offer security and a way out of bad families and even poverty.  Well at least gangs will give you the illusion of having a better life with flashy cars and lots of money.  This is not the case.  Gangs activities do bring in a lot of money but at what cost.  That cost could be your life or even a long prison sentence. Every chance I get I reach out to a young person in a bad area.  I talk with them and try to get them to see the big picture before they make a mistake.  I always hate hearing them say that this is how it has to be. 

     Being victims of crime does not lead every person to live the gang life.  There is something else that goes on when a person is growing up that leads them to the life.  I think if the person is surround by gang members and never gets the chance to choose for himself than yes they are a victim to their social environment.  

Fremon, C. (2004). Father Greg and the Homeboys, rev. ed. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press.

Shelden. (2012).  Youth Gangs in American Society, 4th Edition. Wadsworth, VitalBook file.

 

 

Question 2

Every gang is setup similar, culture wise, to the culture of the community as a whole. There is, however, a slight difference between the culture of the community as a whole and the culture of the gangs. Every gang has their own version of the “Code of the Streets” but they are all roughly similar in content. This content can be easily boiled down to: do whatever it takes to protect your brethren, share everything with your brethren to make sure they survive as well, and do not trust the community that has always turned its back to you. With these beliefs in mind it makes it easy to see why individuals would want to flock to gangs (Shelden 2012).

               The setup here allows for individuals to get the support that the system has never given them. Most gang members have even been left behind by some sort of system that the community has in place or the community has failed to see the outcry of the individual from the young age. Since most inner city adolescence do not have a guardian who can help monitor them on and give them support from an early age, they a lot of times tend to turn to other sources of support. This makes individuals at young ages, as early as 7 years-old, start learning the code of the street (Shelden 2012).

               This young start of learning the code of the street allowed for these kids to start learning the traits that most gangs desire for their members to know. It also gives the youth and insight to gang activity because most of these kids are hanging out with older male relatives who are already in gangs. The relatives of course want to see their blood survive so they welcome them in with open arms and give them the support and friendship that the kid did not previously have (Shelden 2012).

               This support and friendship can be associated with the same beliefs and ideals that the military and police organizations tend to follow in their subcultures. The military teaches you to never leave a soldier behind because they are your brother. It also teaches you that you will do whatever it takes to protect and ensure the safety of all of your fellow military members. This idea is the same idea that gangs have because they want to survive as much as any soldier would want to survive. Both military and police officers are taught to share their resources with one another because it ensures that everyone can survive. Not only do both of these subcultures teach to share and not leave fellow members behind but it also teaches you the value of very close nit friendships. These friendships extend to doing everything together both at work and at home. This follows the same attitude of gang members who like to choose cliché phrases that depict doing everything together including dying together.

               The close relations to gang subcultures and the military/police subculture makes it no wonder that gang members easily infiltrate the military setting and thrive just as well, if not better, than the majority of individuals. Both subcultures teach roughly the same ideas and beliefs (Miller 2014 p. 28). The slight difference is one teaches to importance of the legality of matters while the other teaches survive at all cost.

 

Miller, & Amanda. (2014). Military biker clubs: Brotherhood & mentorship. Air Force Times, 28.

Shelden, Randall G., Sharon Tracy, William Brown. (2012)Youth Gangs in American Society, 4th Edition. Wadsworth.

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Due By (Pacific Time) 10/15/2014 12:00 am
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