Project #45232 - Essay on Beauty

Getting Started - Essays

 

Below the link to this document are links to three others: “Topic 1 – POWER,” “Topic 2 – FAITH,” and “Topic 3 – BEAUTY”.  Each document poses questions that you will use to craft an essay for this course.  You do not – in fact, you cannot – answer all of the questions these documents pose; just use them as inspiration and food for thought as you approach the topic you select.

 

·         Your essay can be about whichever of these topics interests you most, and will be due according to the dates on the syllabus.  To distribute the grading, there are three due dates dividing students into groups by the first letter of their last names.

·         Your essays must be received as a Microsoft Word document; that is, a file with the suffix

“-.doc” or “–docx”.  If you have any doubt, also send the essay as text in the email body. 

·         ESSAYS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED LATE. They must be submitted via email (bfratello@stlcc.edu) by the assigned time and date. I will confirm receipt of your essay via email within 24 hours – if you do not receive confirmation, resend it.  It is your responsibility to ensure they are received.

 

Content and Requirements:

Your essay will be 1,000-1,250 words and worth 100 points, making it worth as much as two tests, and it will be graded assuming that degree of time and effort.  Your tests cover the material in our book chronologically, but your essay will compare and relate objects thematically, regarding the topic you select.  Your assignment is to consider objects with regard to the essay theme, describing it carefully and exploring how it is a good example of that theme.  Here the key is to spread out in the book.  Your essay will focus on 4 objects you select, one from each unit of the book.  The units are laid out on your syllabus – the same as the testing units. 

·         For the purpose of the essay, consider Chapter 1 part of Unit 1.

·         If you wish to use an object from the Introduction, determine which chapter it belongs to culturally and chronologically (date, location), and then treat it as your object from that Unit.

 

Grading Criteria:

In addition to the length and object selection requirements named above, use the five points listed below as a rubric and checklist, and make sure you cover each.

 

1.      Thoughtfulness – nothing is more critical than this.  Your crafting of a thesis should be more than shallow, and your choice of objects should be creative and insightful. It will be difficult to get better than a “C” without a thoughtful approach to the theme.

a.      NOTE: The essay topic is not a thesis statement.  You must refine a specific thesis statement to have written a strong paper.  Each one offers you a “sample title” with a blank to fill in with a specific approach to the topic to encourage specificity.  You are asked to use those sample titles, blank filled in, for your two essays.

2.      Descriptions of art – describe your objects thoroughly using vivid, visually evocate language.  Use relevant terms and put them in boldface.  Consider both content (WHAT the work depicts) and style(HOW it looks).  More than ½ of a good paper will be description – visually evocative observations of your works.  It will be difficult to get better than a “B” without thorough descriptions.  Avoid clichés and do not throw away your descriptions by saying there are “great details” or “lots of details” – paint what you see with words.

3.      Grammar – essays should be typo- and error free.  DOUBLE SPACE for grading.  It will be difficult to get an “A” with more than 2 or 3 such errors.

4.      Organization - essays should have introductions & conclusions, and a logical flow of ideas. Your introduction should, at minimum, tell what your thesis statement is, and identify the three objects you’ll write about.

5.      Formatting - identify the works you choose at their first mention completely, including the artist’s NAME, if known, the object’s Title, in italics and its figure number (in parenthesis). For example, Robert Campin, Mérode, Altarpiece (12-4)

 

These essays require no outside research.  The book, your brain, and the topic are all you need to answer well.  In fact, looking beyond the book to “learn more” about the object can be detrimental to your assignment.  I strongly suggest avoiding this practice.  Look, think, describe – that is your task.

 

 

Make sure your work is your own.  Essays with uncited material will receive no credit.  Also, remember NOT to rely on the WORDING of the book – changing a few words, rearranging phrases, or anything else that relies on the book grammatically, is plagiarism.  Rely on the book’s CONTENT, NOT its wording.  If you are uncertain about how to proceed, I suggest covering the text while you write and looking only at the images.  This will assure that you are writing, and not just rewording in an illegitimate manner.

Subject Art
Due By (Pacific Time) 10/28/2014 08:00 am
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