Project #45558 - Evalute an argument

Choose an argument that you found online (you may utilize an argument from a video posted online, a blog, a news source, a political website, or any other resource that will allow you to satisfactorily meet the requirements of the assignment). You may also select from this week’s relevant recommended resources.

Once you have selected your source, you will then evaluate the argument being presented in the source in an essay of 400 words. In your evaluation:

  1. Identify the issue, the premises, and conclusions of the argument.
  2. Determine whether the argument is sound or unsound (deductive), valid or invalid (deductive), or strong or weak (inductive).
  3. Explain why you have chosen to label it as sound or unsound, valid or invalid, and/or strong or weak.


Use theSteps for evaluating an argument template for assistance with structuring your evaluation; however, you should construct and submit your evaluation in an essay format. Do not merely turn in a bulleted outline. 

The essay must be 400 words in length, excluding title and reference pages, and formatted according to APA style. The only required resource for this assignment is the media object or written work you analyze. This should be the piece that you primarily use to complete this assignment. Secondary sources are welcome but not necessary, and they should not be used in place of the argument piece you analyze.

Attachment;

AU_Logo_Primary_4CPHI 103: Informal Logic

Steps for Evaluating an Argument Template

Directions: Use this step by step guide to assist in breaking down and evaluating an argument in your PHI 103 Informal Logic course.  Column one identifies each step in evaluating an argument, column two defines what is being asked, and column three provides space for you to evaluate the argument.

Steps for Evaluating an Argument

Steps

This means…

Your Argument (student completes)

1. Identify the issue

The issue is the topic that is the focus of the argument and it can usually be stated as a question.

Type the issue.

2. Identify the conclusion.

The conclusion is the statement that responds to the issue question.  It is what the person is trying to convince you is true.

Type the conclusion.

3. Identify the premises

Premises are the statements that support the conclusion.  They are the reasons that the person has for his or her conclusion.

*This form allows for three premises, but not all arguments will contain three premises.

Type Premise 1.

 

Type Premise 2 (if applicable).

 

Type Premise 3 (if applicable).

4. Is the argument deductive?

Deductive arguments claim that their conclusions necessarily follow from their premises.

 

*If Yes, go to step 5.  If no, go to step 9

Choose an item.

5. Is the argument valid or invalid?

A deductive argument is valid if its conclusion must be true whenever its premises are true.  If there is any way for the premises to be true while the conclusion is false, then the argument is invalid.  Note that a valid argument’s premises do not in fact have to be true, as long as the conclusion would be true if the premises were true.

 

*If Valid, go to step 6.  If Invalid, go to step 13.

Choose an item.

6. Does the argument contain any logical fallacies?

 A logical fallacy is a mistake in reasoning that invalidates the claims that someone else is making.

*If Yes, proceed to step 7.  If No, proceed to step 8.

Choose an item.

7. What varieties of fallacious reasoning are present in the argument?

 Certain varieties of fallacious reasoning are so prevalent that they have been given names

Type Fallacy 1.

 

Type Fallacy 2 (if applicable).

 

Type Fallacy 3 (if applicable).

8. Is the argument sound or unsound?

If an argument is valid, it then needs to be evaluated to see if it is sound.  If an argument is sound, (1) it is valid and (2) its premises are true.

*Proceed to step 13.

Choose an item.

9. Is the argument inductive?

Inductive arguments provide reasons that support the conclusion of the argument.  Often causal arguments, generalizations,  and arguments by analogy are inductive argument forms. 

*If Yes, go to step 10.  If no, go to step 13.

 

Choose an item.

 

10. Does the argument contain any logical fallacies?

 A logical fallacy is a mistake in reasoning that invalidates the claims that someone else is making.

*If Yes, proceed to step 10.  If No, proceed to step 12.

Choose an item.

 

11. What varieties of fallacious reasoning are present in the argument?

 Certain varieties of fallacious reasoning are so prevalent that they have been given names

Type Fallacy 1.

 

Type Fallacy 2 (if applicable).

 

Type Fallacy 3 (if applicable).

12. Is the argument strong or weak?

Inductive arguments range from very weak to very strong.  The strength of the argument is determined by how likely the conclusion is based on the premises, the amount of factual evidence that supports the conclusion, or the strength of the causal relation in the argument..

*Proceed to Step 13.

Choose an item.

                                                                   

 

If other, please explain here.

13. Reasoning

Explain your reasoning behind this evaluation.

Explain your reasoning.

 

 

 

Subject Philosophy
Due By (Pacific Time) 11/10/2014 03:00 pm
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