Project #46963 - Total Quality Management Discussion

In one paragraph provide feedback to the following discussion.

 

Designing for product excellence (DFX) is a total approach to product development and design that proactive seeks improvement rather than simply solving problems in relation to design and the manufacturing of products.  It focuses on things done right and goes beyond well-defined customer expectations.  While optimizing desirable features and not compromising quality, DFX minimizes costs through the employment of concurrent engineering, and designing products for manufacturability, assembly and environment (Evans & Lindsay, 2000).  In other words, DFX begins with a qualitative set of principles that guide the process, and then quantitatively analyzes the design.  It is applied to all four stages of a product’s life cycle (Development, Production, Utilization and Disposal) (Kurkin & Januska, 2010), and DFX is often a facet of an organizations Continuous Improvement (CI) initiatives.

            The basic concepts of DFX begin with identifying the customer requirements and the technical requirements.  Next, an evaluation of the competitive products and the technical requirements is conducted.  Decisions then are made about the incorporation of the design elements in relation to assembly, the environment, or other “design for” goals.  In designing for manufacturability (DFM) or assembly (DFA), the product design can affect its ease of production, automation aspects, costs, risks, and quality.  Designing the product to align with an optimized engineering process of high yield, low cost production in relation to the type and form of raw materials, tolerances, and secondary processes is all part of DFM.  By reducing the total number of parts, developing a modular design with standard components, designing multifunctional, multiuse parts, and designing for ease of fabrication are all important aspects of DFM.  However, so is avoiding separate fasteners, maximizing compliance while minimizing assembly directions, and handling (Greenlee, n.d.).

            Designing for Environment (DfE) promotes green best practices in relation to designing for environmental processing and manufacturing by ensuring that raw material extraction and the manufacturing process waste, pollution, energy and is safe for people and the environment.  Secondly, DfE ascribes to environmentally friendly packaging and employing recyclables.  The environmental impact of the end-of-life of the product is incorporated into its design, and products are designed for energy efficiency.  This is all analyzed through a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) (EPA, 2014).  Today, designing for the environment with a careful eye to sustainability, regulations, customer preference, and the incorporation of green aspects are not only socially responsible, they are also marketable.

References

Environmental Protection Agency (2014). Design for the environment. Retrieved from http://www.epa.gov/dfe/

Greenlee, R. (n.d.). Design for manufacturing - Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.unm.edu/~bgreen/ME101/dfm.pdf

Kurkin, O. & Januska, M. (2010). Knowledge management and innovation : a business competitive edge perspective. Proceedings of the 15th International Business Information Management Association Conferences (IBIMA 2010), ISBN: 9780982148945 31

Subject Business
Due By (Pacific Time) 11/10/2014 01:00 pm
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