Project #47559 - 3 thibgs

  • must be on time
  • apa format
  • original work
  • i provided chapters for refernce
  • Write a 700- to 1400-word letter to a representative philosopher in one of the following schools of thought, discussing why you agree or disagree with his or her position on this concept.
Select one of the concepts below to discuss in your assignment.
  • Continental: “The world is absurd, in the sense that no ultimate explanation can be given for why it is the way it is” (Moore & Bruder, 2011, p. 152).
  • Pragmatism: “There is [no] such thing as a fixed, absolute truth” (Moore & Bruder, 2011, p. 206).
  • Analytic philosophy: “The only things we can now for certain we learn through sense experience.”
 
4 sentences on each of the following:
 
  •  Thought Experiment - The Myth of Sisyphus 
Albert Camus, an existential philosopher who lived from 1912 to 1960, wrote an essay titled "The Myth of Sisyphus," in 1941 (during World War II).
 
Sisyphus was a Greek who was punished by the gods for having lied to them and cheated death. For all eternity, Sisyphus was made to roll a giant boulder up a hill, only to have it roll back down again just as he almost reached the top. Camus argued that this pointless and wholly futile task was similar to the life of humans: Our lives are pointless and, as such, we are condemned to all eternity to the futile tasks of living.
 
Assuming all of that is true, can we still find meaning in our lives, even if they are hopeless and pointless? Can Sisyphus's eternally futile task still have meaning? Can hopelessness be meaning?
Camus says that this is the whole point of existence:  to not let the pains of life defeat us.  The world is absurd, and sometimes it causes us pain and angst, but we need to find joy and meaning in this shared experience and leave the world a better place than when we entered it.  We should live purposefully and thoughtfully, and really stand up for the things we think are right.  If we live this way, we have truly lived an authentic and meaningful life, even if we have to roll the boulder up the hill only to have it roll down again every day.  Be Sisyphus, happy.
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Experience Machine

Philosopher Robert Nozick's Experience Machine is a strong hint that we should probably just plug ourselves into a kind of hedonistic version of The Matrix.
 
Suppose there were an experience machine that would give you any experience you desired. Superduper neuropsychologists could stimulate your brain so that you would think and feel you were writing a great novel, or making a friend, or reading an interesting book. All the time you would be floating in a tank, with electrodes attached to your brain. Should you plug into this machine for life, preprogramming your life experiences?...Of course, while in the tank you won't know that you're there; you'll think that it's all actually happening...Would you plug in?"
 
 
 
Mary the Colorblind Neuroscientist 
EXPAND
Sometimes referred to as the Inverted Spectrum Problem or the Knowledge Argument, this thought experiment is meant to stimulate discussions against a purely physicalist view of the universe, namely the suggestion that the universe, including mental processes, is entirely physical. This thought experiment tries to show that there are indeed non-physical properties -- and attainable knowledge -- that can only be learned through conscious experience.
Mary is a brilliant scientist who is, for whatever reason, forced to investigate the world from a black and white room via a black and white television monitor. She specializes in the neurophysiology of vision and acquires, let us suppose, all the physical information there is to obtain about what goes on when we see ripe tomatoes, or the sky, and use terms like 'red', 'blue', and so on. She discovers, for example, just which wavelength combinations from the sky stimulate the retina, and exactly how this produces via the central nervous system the contraction of the vocal cords and expulsion of air from the lungs that results in the uttering of the sentence 'The sky is blue'...What will happen when Mary is released from her black and white room or is given a color television monitor? Will she learn anything or not?
Put another way, Mary knows everything there is to know about color except for one crucial thing: She's never actually experienced color consciously. Her first experience of color was something that she couldn't possibly have anticipated; there's a world of difference between academically knowing something versus having actual experience of that thing.
This thought experiment teaches us that there will always be more to our perception of reality, including consciousness itself, than objective observation. It essentially shows us that we don't know what we don't know. The thought experiment also gives us hope for the future; should we augment our sensory capabilities and find ways to expand conscious awareness, we could open up entirely new avenues of psychological and subjective exploration.
 

Subject Philosophy
Due By (Pacific Time) 11/16/2014 03:00 pm
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