Project #49404 - Over Population

Despite a slow down in the birth rate among the western nations, globally, we are facing enormous pressures on our resources over the next forty years.  If current projections hold, and there is no reason to doubt that they will not, we will increase our global population from the current 7 billion people to close to 9-9.5+ billion by the year 2050 (hard to say how high this will go).  All of these people will need the same basic necessities of life we utilize; food, water, shelter and some means of employment.

This surge in population growth also is occurring at a time when the effects of climate change are becoming more evident.  The Arctic seas and glaciers are melting at an accelerating rate.  98% of all glaciers on Earth are melting and snow capped mountains are disappearing. Glacier National Park has lost virtually all of its glaciers, and even the Himalayas, the tallest mountains in the world, are now showing evidence of a melt. The potential result of this process will be that many low lying coastal areas will be under water by the end of the century. 

In short, we have much to think about.

Most of this population growth will occur in the poorest of countries where child mortality normally runs at 50% and health care is limited or virtually non-existent. And most families are still tied to an agricultural way of life that favors large families, in essence, to reproduce their labor supply.  These are traditions that have existed for centuries and cultural change will take time. We need to have the patience to see that through and not put ourselves in the position of making judgments about other cultures and their way of life.    

Recently however, China and India, literally sent reeling from worldwide condemnation, are seeing the disastrous consequences of trying to enforce measures to curb population growth through female infanticide, the killing of new born baby girls. (This was not sanctioned by either government but came from individual choices made by women and couples.) In China, baby boys now outnumber baby girls by a staggering rate, and this will have serious social consequences for their future. However, this is having an effect on halting the practice of infanticide, plus as both countries industrialize and switch to a market economy, couples are having fewer children.

But the reality is that there are already 7+ billion people and the vast majority of them will want children. This is a good thing as odd as that seems. We need generations to follow us as a negative birth rate is as harmful as a soaring birth rate. But we need to consider the impact of those additional 3 billion people.

 So I would like you to consider the issue of sustainability, what we are going to need to sustain us as we move through the coming boom?

1.  The article by George Musser discusses the goals of the Millennium Development as possible solutions that need to be instituted fairly rapidly to respond to this population growth: specifically, supporting scientific research to understand and publicize these changes; reducing poverty; preserve critical habitats; wean off fossil fuels; provide cheap irrigation to poor farmers; improve health systems; prepare political and economic organizations for smaller economic growth. Off these proposals, which one do you think will most effective in addressing the problems that will come with the anticipated population growth? Explain your answer.

2. The people we will be adding to our global population will need energy resources. The effect of this can already be seen in India where electricity rates are soaring and rolling blackouts are becoming common. In China, coal mining has greatly accelerated but as this is an industry that is largely unregulated and few safety precautions exist, the number if miners killed in coal mine accidents now is the thousands each year. We are all going to need a cheap, reliable energy source.  One of the proposals on the table is nuclear energy.  The United States stopped building nuclear power plants after the Three Mile Island accident, but France continued its nuclear program. Today, 80% of France’s energy needs are met by nuclear energy.  They have the cheapest energy costs of any nation in Europe, and also the cleanest air as they are not burning fossil fuels anywhere near the rate of other nations. They have built a new generation of nuclear reactors that reuse spent nuclear fuel, long a concern in the United States, and they have not had a single nuclear power plant accident.  Currently they are in negotiations with China to build nuclear power plants in China.  So……does the United States need to rethink its stance on nuclear power to meet domestic energy needs?

3. If you could ask President Obama one question on our energy policy, climate change, or another environmental issues, what would that be? 

You will need to obtain the following two articles:



 “The Climax of Humanity.” By George Musser. Scientific American. Special Issue. September 2005. pgs. 44-47.



“Human Population Grows Up.” Joel E. Cohen. Scientific American. Special Issue. September 2005. pgs. 48-55.

 



 

 

 

 

Subject General
Due By (Pacific Time) 11/29/2014 12:00 am
Report DMCA
TutorRating
pallavi

Chat Now!

out of 1971 reviews
More..
amosmm

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
PhyzKyd

Chat Now!

out of 1164 reviews
More..
rajdeep77

Chat Now!

out of 721 reviews
More..
sctys

Chat Now!

out of 1600 reviews
More..
sharadgreen

Chat Now!

out of 770 reviews
More..
topnotcher

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
XXXIAO

Chat Now!

out of 680 reviews
More..
All Rights Reserved. Copyright by AceMyHW.com - Copyright Policy