Project #53230 - ENG 125 Course

Week 1 Discussions

    1. Why Read Literature?

      Chapter 1 of our text provides a number of reasons why people choose to explore literature. Clugston (2014) writes that there is “a powerful curiosity about human relationships and how to cope in the world in which we find ourselves” (section 1.1, “Connecting: Entering Into a Literary Experience,” para. 2). The text gives a number of general motivations for reading, but it is helpful to put those motivations into context. Your initial post should be at least 200 words in length, not including references.

      In your post, answer the following questions:

      • What does literature offer an individual?
      • How has the importance of reading changed from earlier eras (pre-digital/audio/visual media) to our present day? Do you think we read differently now than we did in prior generations?
      • Do you think Clugston’s quote is valid? How have perceptions regarding the value of literature changed, if at all?
      • What causes people’s perceptions regarding the value of literature to change?

      As you consider these questions and begin writing, incorporate readings found in Chapters 1-3 to help illustrate the points you make.

      Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ initial posts. Each response should be at least 75 words in length and address two or more of the following points:

      • Do you agree with your classmates’ perspectives? Why, or why not? Be specific.
      • Ask a specific question to encourage further discussion on the topic.
      • Challenge your classmates’ interpretation of literature and/or point of view.
      • Do a small amount of research and share what you learn with your peers about the topic discussed in this post.

 

  1. Writing About Literature

    As we explored in the “Why Read Literature?” discussion, literature can provide us with a multitude of perspectives, ideas, and experiences. Additionally, there is a long tradition of critical reading and writing about literature (i.e., analyzing literature to seek a deeper understanding about various interests and concerns). Chapter 2 focuses on these ideas. Your initial post should be at least 200 words in length. The minimum word count does not include references.

    In your post, answer the following questions:

    • Why might a writer feel compelled to write about literature? How does it benefit us personally and/or professionally?
    • What kind of writing and thinking skills do you hope that you will develop in this course based on the description of writing about literature in sections 1.1, 2.1 and 2.3 of the text?

    As you consider these questions and begin answering them, incorporate readings found in Chapters 1-3 to help illustrate the points you make.

    Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ initial posts. Each response should be at least 75 words in length and should address two or more of the following points:

    • Do you agree with your classmates’ perspectives? Why, or why not? Be specific.
    • Ask a specific question to encourage further discussion on the topic.
    • Challenge your classmates’ interpretation of literature and/or point of view.
    • Do a small amount of research and share what you learn with your peers about the topic discussed in this post.

 


Week 1


Assignment
To complete the following assignment, go to this week's Assignment link in the left navigation.

Journal One: Identifying Conflicts From Other Sources

About Journals
What is a journal?
A journal is traditionally considered a personal reflective writing that is informal in nature. However, an academic journal for your college course is more than that. It is a way to practice formal academic writing, which pays close attention to spelling, grammar, and stylistics. It has a controlling thought that is explored and supported with appropriate sources. While the purpose of this journal is to have you thoughtfully respond to specific prompts and connect your learning to the assigned readings, it is not meant to be a demonstration of perfect APA style. However, you should follow general APA formatting and style guidelines (include your name, double space your paper, and reference your sources).  

How do I write a journal entry in ENG125?
In Weeks One, Two, and Four of this course, you are required to write a journal entry. Each journal prompt will provide specific information regarding what you need to respond to such as assigned readings, how conflict is intertwined into literature, and how certain literary techniques enhance and draw out certain conflicts. The instructions for each journal assignment are formatted using bulleted lists to help you organize your responses. The minimum word count for this assignment is 250 words, and you are expected to use APA style in setting up the document.

Why will I write journal entries in ENG125?
The purpose of a journal entry in this class is to help you explore the relationship between conflict and how it is developed in different literary genres. Also, the goal is to develop your ideas about conflict, genre, and literary techniques through the next five weeks and build these ideas into your Week Five Literary Analysis. This activity will help you write a more effective and detailed literary analysis since you will have reflected on conflict and its representation in literature early and often in the course.

How will my journal entry be assessed?
The instructor will review your journal entry to ensure that you have answered each bulleted point and incorporated the appropriate materials into your assignment. APA format and citations will play a minor role in the evaluation of this journal entry, as will grammar and stylistics. For more details on how your journal entry will be assessed, please review the rubric for this assignment located below.

Journal One: Identifying Conflicts From Other Sources
For your first journal entry, you are required to explore the different types of conflict that are found not only in literature, but in everyday life. Be sure to read each type of conflict thoroughly to get a firm understanding of them since you will be analyzing these conflicts throughout the next five weeks.

In your journal
  • Describe where you see each of the five conflicts in everyday life (e.g., in social media, music, literature, or online learning). How does conflict appear in two or three of the various venues mentioned above?
  • Identify what types of conflict you saw in one of this week’s reading assignments.
  • Give specific examples as support for each conflict you identified.
  • Explain why these conflicts are important and how they create meaning. What meaning(s) do they create?
When submitting your journal entry, make sure to
  • Proofread your work for errors in grammar, mechanics, and style.
  • Format the journal entry according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center. Refer to the Ashford Writing Center’s Sample APA Title Page for guidelines on formatting a title page in APA style.
  • Provide (to the best of your ability) a reference for the text you used, including in-text citations and references listed at the end of the journal entry. Refer to the Ashford Writing Center’s Comprehensive APA Reference List Models and Citation and Reference Guide for guidelines on in text citations in APA style.
  • Provide a reference for the text you used. Refer to the Ashford Writing Center’s Citation and Reference Guide for guidelines on citing sources in APA style.
  • Perform a word count check to make sure the journal entry is 250 to 500 words in length.
  • Save the document as a Microsoft Word or compatible .doc or .docx file.
  • Use a naming convention that includes your last name, week number, and the journal number (e.g., Smith_W2.doc)

Week 2

Discussions
To participate in the following discussions, go to this week's Discussion link in the left navigation.

    1. Literary Techniques and Their Connection to Conflict in Literature

      Read the required materials and review the handout Plot, Theme, and Conflict. All stories have a theme that forms the plot. Also, literary elements and techniques contribute to creating and highlighting the theme. In this discussion you will

      • Choose a story from the textbook.
      • Describe the core conflict represented in the story.
      • Describe the theme of the story.
      • Select three literary elements/techniques in the story and describe them.
      • Explain how the elements/techniques illustrate the theme and conflict expressed in the story.

      As you consider these questions and begin answering them, incorporate readings found in Chapters 4-7 to help illustrate the points you make. Your initial post should be at least 200 words in length. The minimum word count does not include references.

      Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ initial posts. Each response should be at least 75 words in length and should address two or more of the following points:

      • Do you agree with your classmates’ perspectives? Why, or why not? Be specific.
      • Ask a specific question to encourage further discussion on the topic.
      • Challenge your classmates’ interpretation of literature and/or point of view.
      • Do a small amount of research and share what you learn with your peers about the topic discussed in this post.

  1. Character Analysis and Setting

    In the stories you have read in Chapters 4-7, you have been introduced to several kinds of characters. Using a story that is different than the one you analyzed in the Literary Techniques and Their Connection to Conflict in Literature discussion, describe a character you sympathize with by answering the following questions:

    • Why did this character interest you? What choices does the character make, and how do the choices (or the result of the choices) contribute to the theme of the story?
    • What kind of conflict (internal/external) did this character encounter, and how did he/she handle it?
    • How does the setting contribute to the character’s development?
    • How does the setting contribute to the character’s experience and give the story more meaning?

    As you consider these questions and answer them, incorporate readings found in Chapters 4-7 to help illustrate the points you make. Your initial post should be at least 200 words in length. The minimum word count does not include references.

    Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ initial posts. Each response should be at least 75 words in length and should address two or more of the following questions:

    • Did your classmate acknowledge the complexities in the character he/she chose? If so, how so? If not, what should he/she consider?
    • Are there other conflicts that your classmate should consider? For example, if your classmate primarily discussed a character’s external conflicts, offer an internal conflict that the character faces, or vice versa.
    • Does your classmate adequately connect the character with the setting? Are there details that he/she did not discuss but are important to the story? Why are these details important?

 

Week 2
Assignment
To complete the following assignment, go to this week's Assignment link in the left navigation.

Journal Two: Identifying Conflict in Two Texts

Read About Journals in ENG125: Introduction to Literature for more information about the purpose and expectations for journals.

This week, you continue writing your journal entries. This journal entry is designed to help you document ideas about conflicts in literature, which will contribute to the information required for the Week Three Draft and the Week Five Literary Analysis. Recognizing conflict is essential to understanding the various commentaries literature can provide.

In Journal One, you identified conflict as it might appear in our everyday world and from other sources. Now, consider the following definition of conflict and how it relates to literature from the textbook or the story/poetry links provided under the requirements for the Literary Analysis:

Conflict is opposing actions, ideas, and decisions that hold a plot together...the struggle that shapes the plot in a story.

Chapters 1-7 of our text contain a number of stories and poems, each of which rely on at least one conflict. Choose two of this week’s assigned literary works and write about the conflicts presented in each of them. In 250 to 500 words
  • State the specific conflicts you see in each work.
  • Describe the characters, forces, and/or entities that are at odds.
  • Explain why you think the conflicts are significant and what meanings/understandings they provide to the texts.
  • Paraphrase, quote, and/or summarize content from the works to support your observations. Don’t forget to add in-text citations for the works you draw from.
  • Explain how each conflict has meaning beyond the work in which it appears. Why is it important to be able to recognize conflict in a literary text and extend that understanding of conflict to the world at large?
  • From the stories you are reading, how much do similar elements of symbolism, metaphor, allusion, and/or allegory apply and add depth to an idea raised in the literature?
    • For instance, in George Orwell’s novel Animal Farm, the pigs and farmers can be seen as symbolic of workers versus managers to make points about class struggles, calling into question the idea of equality in society.
    • In another example, in the “Story of an Hour,” the main character expresses personal conflict in her process of coming to terms with her husband’s supposed death. But this moment symbolizes more than just her personal grief. What does it suggest about societal expectations regarding women and how they should respond to grief? How might those expectations of grief still apply to women’s roles? How does the symbolism show a conflict between Mrs. Mallard and her own desires? Are these “women’s desires” in conflict with current social norms?
As you are writing this journal entry, please review the expectations for the Week Five Literary Analysis, which you are working toward throughout the course.

When submitting your journal entry, make sure to
  • Proofread your work for errors in grammar, mechanics, and style.
  • Format the journal entry according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center. Refer to the Ashford Writing Center’s Sample APA Title Page for guidelines on formatting a title page in APA style.
  • Provide (to the best of your ability) a reference for the text you used, including in-text citations and references listed at the end of the journal entry. Refer to the Ashford Writing Center’s Comprehensive APA Reference List Models and Citation and Reference Guide for guidelines on in text citations in APA style.
  • Provide a reference for the text you used. Refer to the Ashford Writing Center’s Citation and Reference Guide for guidelines on citing sources in APA style.
  • Perform a word count check to make sure the journal entry is 250 to 500 words in length.
  • Save the document as a Microsoft Word or compatible .doc or .docx file.
  • Use a naming convention that includes your last name, week number, and the journal number (e.g., Smith_W2.doc).

Week 3 Discussions
To participate in the following discussions, go to this week's Discussion link in the left navigation.

    1. Poetry and Performance

      Poetry is a literary form that can offer readers a different experience based on whether the poem is read silently, read aloud, or simply listened to when read by someone else. For example, you might hear a certain rhythm or change of pace that you might not catch when simply reading the poem silently to yourself. For this week’s discussion, you will read and listen to poetry. Read and listen with careful eyes and ears so you can respond thoughtfully to the two parts of the discussion this week.

      Part One: Read “We Real Cool” and “My Papa’s Waltz” in your textbook. Then, answer the following questions about one of the poems:

      • What is the theme of the poem? How do you know this is the theme?
      • What poetic devices (rhythm, figurative language, etc.) are used in the poem? Offer at least two examples.
      • How do these poetic devices contribute to the development of the poem’s message?

      Support your ideas with textual details and analyses. When you have answered the questions above, then move on to the next set of instructions in Part Two.

      Part Two: Listen to “We Real Cool” and “My Papa’s Waltz.” These clips demonstrate the importance of performance, rhythm, and musicality in the poetic form. Describe your listening experience of the same poem you wrote about above. If you are unable to listen to these poems due to an auditory impairment, please reach out to your Instructor for an alternative prompt for this discussion. Respond to at least two of the following questions:

      • How did hearing the poem recited aloud compare to a silent reading of it?
      • Did the performance highlight certain words or phrases that were not as apparent in a silent reading?
      • Did the pace change and, if so, how did it change your understanding of the poem?
      • Did words have different connotations and, if so, what kind(s) of connotation did you associate with the poem?
      • Do you think reading poetry aloud is a worthwhile endeavor when analyzing it? Why, or why not?

      Support your ideas with textual details and analyses. Address how specific literary elements and techniques contributed to your experience and the conflict. Your initial post should be at least 200 words in length. The minimum word count does not include references.

      Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ initial posts. Each response should be at least 75 words in length and should address two or more of the following:

      • Do you agree with your classmates’ perspectives? Why, or why not? Be specific.
      • Ask a specific question to encourage further discussion on the topic.
      • Challenge your classmates’ interpretation of literature and/or point of view.
      • Do a small amount of research and share what you learn with your peers about the topic discussed in this post.

  1. Week Three Draft: Workshop

    As part of the writing process, you are expected to reflect on your work and revise and edit accordingly. It is also useful to establish a community of learners in which you help edit and proofread each other’s papers. This reciprocal process will help you identify areas of strength and weakness in others’ writing as well as reflect on your own work and perhaps discover similar strengths and weaknesses. For this week, you will be performing a peer review on a classmate’s Week Three Draft. For your initial post

    • Read the instructions for completing the Week Three Draft assignment.
    • Then, do one of the following:
      • Upload an early version of your Week Three Draft (at least 300 words) (.doc format) as a new thread with your name and title of paper.
      • Create a new thread in which you copy and paste your draft into the body of your post.
      • Post a detailed outline (at least 200 words) that clearly illustrates how you plan to organize your essay. The outline should contain a working thesis, topic sentences, and details/textual references to support the topic sentences. See the Sample Outline in the Ashford Writing Center for guidance.

    The draft or outline you share in the discussion needs to meet the specified word requirements (above) and must be double-spaced. You will build on the draft or outline and submit it as your Week Three Draft assignment this week.

    Guided Response: Respond to at least one classmates using the Draft Workshop Template. Review a draft or outline written by a classmate who has not yet received feedback. Complete all questions on the template and upload it as a .doc file.

 



Week 3 Assignment
To complete the following assignment, go to this week's Assignment link in the left navigation.

Week Three Draft

Why Write a Draft?
All writers begin a project by brainstorming their ideas and constructing a rough draft. The draft is not a completed paper; rather, it allows writers to explore and develop their ideas. As part of the writing process, it is important for writers to rehearse their materials before those materials “go live.”

You will complete a draft this week that will allow you to explore and develop your ideas in preparation for your Literary Analysis, which is due in Week Five. Writing a literary analysis helps us to more readily connect conflicts in literature to our everyday experiences and analyze our own lives as well as human motivations and behavior in general. Finally, it improves our writing and reading skills overall.

How to Write the Draft
Closely read and take notes on the Literary Analysis assignment found under the Week Five tab. There, you will find complete directions. By this point in the course, you will have discussed two texts, defined at least one conflict, and identified and described at least three literary techniques as specified in the Week Five Literary Analysis prompt.

For this assignment, you will construct a working thesis statement that defines in detail the conflict you will analyze, the two texts you will address, and the literary devices you will apply to your final analysis. Review the Writing a Clear and Sound Thesis for a Literary Analysis for support.

The body of your paper, which will consist of 800 to 1000 words, is to be presented in four sections as detailed below.
  • Conflict
    • Identify the conflict in the two texts you have chosen.
    • Identify the similarities and differences in the representation of the conflict in the texts.
    • Identify three literary techniques and elements that help represent this conflict.
  • Literary Techniques in [Title of First Chosen Text]
    • Explain where and how you see the three literary techniques at work in your chosen first text.
    • Provide specific examples by quoting, paraphrasing, and/or summarizing.
    • Explain how the literary techniques/examples define and draw out this conflict.
  • Literary Techniques in [Title of Second Chosen Text]
    • Explain where and how you see the three literary techniques at work in your second chosen text.
    • Provide specific examples by quoting, paraphrasing, and/or summarizing.
    • Explain how the literary techniques define and draw out this conflict.
  • Similarities and Differences
    • Compare and contrast the manner in which the texts address the conflict.
    • Explain if they use different and/or similar literary techniques to articulate that conflict.
    • Explain the different and/or similar resolutions of each conflict and how those resolutions were reached.
Compile a working references list on a separate page that is formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.

Keep in mind you are writing a literary analysis so please avoid supplying extensive summaries of the texts. Write a summary only when it aids you in describing a specific conflict and/or application of a literary device.

Assignment Requirements
  • Topic: Your draft must contain a working thesis that helps you to explore the topic. Your paper must address at least two of the texts (one of which must be a short story), a specific conflict, and at least three of the literary techniques as listed in the Week Five Literary Analysis guidelines.
  • Length: Your draft must be 800 to 1000 words in length, excluding the title and references pages.
  • Sources: Your draft must contain a working references page with two to four sources used to support your examples and findings.
  • Elements of Academic Writing: Your draft must contain clear transitions between sections.
  • APA: Your assignment must be formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
    • Separate Title Page: Must include a separate title page that lists the following: an original title, your name, date of submission, and your instructor’s name.
    • Separate References Page: At the end of your paper, include a separate references page that lists all sources utilized for and cited within your analysis.
    • Proper Citations: All sources must be properly cited according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center, both within the text of your paper and on the references page.

Week 4 Discussions
To participate in the following discussions, go to this week's Discussion link in the left navigation.

  1. Tragedy

    Shakespeare’s Macbeth is often considered one of literature’s greatest tragedies, not only because of Macbeth’s tragic fall from grace, but because of how the play relates to human nature and the conflicts inherent in human nature. In your initial post, please do the following:

    • State a conflict that you see present in Macbeth (please refer to the list of conflicts).
    • Respond to one of the following and provide specific textual examples:
      • Describe a key conflict in the play and how it corresponds to a character’s development.
      • Describe two key literary techniques and elements of drama that aid in developing the conflict.
      • Explain how the conflict identified in the play relates to human nature and the human condition.

    Initial post must be 200 to 300 words in length and posted by Day 3.

    Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ initial posts. Each response should be at least 75 words in length and should address two or more of the following points:

    • Do you agree with your classmates’ perspectives? Why, or why not? Be specific.
    • Ask a specific question to encourage further discussion on the topic.
    • Challenge your classmates’ interpretation of literature and/or point of view.
    • Do a small amount of research and share what you learn with your peers on the topic discussed in this post.
       
  2. Comedy

    In the “Tragedy” discussion this week, you explored the function of conflict in a tragedy and how the conflict is enhanced by certain literary elements and techniques. In this discussion activity, you will focus on comedy.

    Sharon E. Cooper’s Mistaken Identity: A Ten Minute Play is a modern comedy that centers on the quest for love and understanding. The function of the conflict in this play and the way the literary elements and techniques enhance the conflict is different from what we studied in Macbeth.

    In your initial post
     
    • State a conflict that you see present in Mistaken Identity: A Ten Minute Play (please refer to the Types of Conflicts Found in Literature.)
    • Respond to one of the following, providing specific textual references to illustrate your ideas:
      • Describe a key conflict in the play and how it corresponds to a character’s development.
      • Describe two key literary techniques and elements and techniques of drama that aid in developing the conflict.
      • Explain how and why the conflict in this comedy is different from and/or similar to the conflict explored in tragedy.

    Initial post must be 200 to 300 words in length and posted by Day 3.

    Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ initial posts. Each response should be at least 75 words in length and should address two or more of the following points:

    • Do you agree with your classmates’ perspectives? Why, or why not? Be specific.
    • Ask a specific question to encourage further discussion on the topic.
    • Challenge your classmates’ interpretation of literature and/or point of view.
    • Do a small amount of research and share what you learn with your peers about the topic discussed in this post.

 



Week 4 Assignment
To complete the following assignment, go to this week's Assignment link in the left navigation.

Journal Three: Addressing Problems of Writing Your Literary Analysis

Read About Journals in ENG125: Introduction to Literature for more information about the purpose and expectations for journals.

As you move forward to reflect on the process of writing your Literary Analysis Draft in Week Three, watch the video Writing the Compare and Contrast Essay, which provides an overview of the writing process.  This may seem familiar if you have taken a course in introductory writing (e.g., Freshman Composition, Introduction to Composition, Composition I).  Keep this writing process in mind as you follow the instructions below to reflect on your work.

In this journal
  • Discuss the process you used to write the literary analysis for the Week Three rough draft assignment.
  • Describe how a literary analysis is different than other essays you have written.
  • Explain what literary concept, definition, technique or conflict you found most confusing.  What did you do to try to understand that subject?
  • Ask your professor questions about problems or issues you encountered during the writing process of your draft assignment. Take advantage of this opportunity to explain the challenges you faced so your instructor can provide advice to assist you.
  • Share a success you experienced when creating your draft. Why do you see it as a positive move forward in your writing process and your analysis/understanding of a text?
When submitting your journal entry, make sure to
  • Proofread your work for errors in grammar, mechanics, and style.
  • Format the journal entry according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center. Refer to the Ashford Writing Center’s Sample APA Title Page for guidelines on formatting a title page in APA style.
  • Provide (to the best of your ability) a reference for the text you used, including in-text citations and references listed at the end of the journal entry. Refer to the Ashford Writing Center’s Comprehensive APA Reference List Models and Citation and Reference Guide for guidelines on in text citations in APA style.
  • Provide a reference for the text you used. Refer to the Ashford Writing Center’s Citation and Reference Guide for guidelines on citing sources in APA style.
  • Perform a word count check to make sure the journal entry is 250 to 500 words in length.
  • Save the document as a Microsoft Word or compatible .doc or .docx file.
  • Use a naming convention that includes your last name, week number, and the journal number (e.g., Smith_W2.doc).
The Ashford Writing Center (AWC) has two kinds of tutoring available to you.
  • Live Chat: If you have writing-related questions about a topic before you draft a discussion post or submit a written assignment, you will now be able to chat live with a tutor for up to 20 minutes. Live Chat will be available Monday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. (PST). AWC Live Chat
  • Email Paper Review: If you have a draft, partial draft, or even if you’re having trouble getting started, you can complete a submission form and email your paper to the AWC for review.
    • Writing Tutors will do their best to return your paper with their comments within 48 hours, not including Saturdays and Sundays. Please plan accordingly if you would like to receive feedback before an assignment due date. AWC Email Paper Review

Week 5 Discussions
To participate in the following discussions, go to this week's Discussion link in the left navigation.

  1. Distinguish Critical Approaches

    In the Critical Literary Theories handout, four different kinds of critical approaches are presented. Choose two of those critical approaches and address the points below.

    • Describe each critical approach in detail.
    • Compare and/or contrast the two critical approaches. How are they different and similar?
    • Determine which critical approach you find most useful for examining the conflicts and meaning in literature.
    • Explain why you chose this particular approach as the most useful. Why does it appeal to you?

    Your initial post should be at least 200 words in length. The minimum word count does not include references.

    Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ initial posts. Each response should be at least 75 words in length and should address two or more of the following points:

    • Do you agree with your classmates’ perspectives? Why, or why not? Be specific.
    • Ask a specific question to encourage further discussion on the topic.
    • Challenge your classmates’ interpretation of literature and/or point of view.
    • Do a small amount of research and share what you learn with your peers about the topic discussed in this post.

  2. Forming Questions Based on Critical Reading

    In this discussion, you will reflect on what you learned in the course.

    Construct an open-ended question (see How to Ask an Open-ended Question handout) to ask your peers about the literature you read in the class. Avoid asking closed-end questions that require a “yes” or “no” answer. The question should not be overly broad or too general, but focus on specific literary conflicts, techniques, or themes.

    In your initial post, please also share what you learned by reading your peers’ posts throughout the class. Review your initial response to the Clugston (2014) quote from Week One: “[T]here’s a powerful curiosity about human relationships and how to cope in the world in which we find ourselves” (section 1.1, “Connecting: Entering Into a Literary Experience,” para. 2). Based on what you learned about literature, what has changed?  How will these changes impact your perspective on literature?

    This exercise will allow you to engage in a discussion you create with your peers. It also helps you to ask your own questions about literature, which can serve as a gateway to initiating critical analysis. Your initial post should be at least 200 words in length. The minimum word count does not include references.

    Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ initial posts by Day 7. Each response should be at least 75 words in length and you should attempt to answer the questions posed by your classmates. Additionally, reflect on how you and your classmates have progressed throughout the course. Also note similarities or differences you see between how you and your classmates respond to the Clugston quote now versus at the beginning of the course.

 



Literary Analysis
To complete the following final paper, go to this week's Literary Analysis link in the left navigation.

Literary Analysis

Why Write a Literary Analysis?
Literature teaches us about the value of conflict. We experience conflict in our personal relationships and in our interactions with society. Literary analysis helps us recognize the conflict at work in literature, which gives us greater insight into the personal conflicts that we face. In addition, learning how to closely read, analyze, and critique a text is beneficial beyond a literature course in that it improves our writing, reading, and critiquing abilities overall.

How to Write a Literary Analysis
It is important to understand that some conflicts in literature might not always be obvious. Considering how an author addresses conflict via literary techniques can reveal other more complex conflicts or different kinds of conflicts that interact in multiple ways. Analyzing those more complicated elements can help you discover what literature represents about the human experience and condition. With this in mind, consider that your thesis might be a claim about how two pieces make similar representations, or it can show two different points of view on a similar issue.

The literary analysis should be organized around your thesis (argument), which is the controlling idea of the entire essay. In the Week Three assignment, you identified two conflicts and created an initial thesis statement in relation to two of the literary works from the List of Literary Works. In this assignment, you will refine that thesis even further and build on your overall argument utilizing the literary techniques below. Reflect on feedback from your Instructor and peers in previous weeks to help you revise your rough draft into a final paper.

For this literary analysis, write a 1250- to 1600-word essay in which you do the following:
  • Revise/develop the thesis from Week Three based on the feedback you have received. Again, the thesis should focus on the conflict(s) you chose to write about. This thesis should provide deeper insight into the possible meanings surrounding the chosen conflict(s) that you see in the chosen literary texts. Throughout your analysis, you must use at least two primary sources and two sources from the Ashford University Library to support your thesis.
  • Review and incorporate instructor and classroom feedback on at least one conflict listed in Types of Conflict Found in Literature from two literary works in this course. One of the literary works must be a short story. See the List of Literary Works and Types of Conflict Found in Literature.
  • Analyze three literary techniques to help define and draw out the conflict(s) chosen.
  • Explain how the texts utilize the literary techniques below to describe the conflict(s).
  • Compare and contrast the two texts you chose.
List of Literary Works
For your Literary Analysis, select at least two works from the List of Literary Works that share the same type(s) of conflict(s). Remember, one of them must be a short story. You can either compare two short stories, a short story and a poem, or a short story and a play.

List of Types of Conflicts Found in Literature
In the document Types of Conflicts Found in Literature, you will find a list of possible conflicts to explore in your Literary Analysis. Please note that you must write about one of the conflicts in the list of literary texts provided. To help you better understand each conflict and how it might be apparent, examples from popular culture have been provided. However, please note that your Literary Analysis must not be about popular culture, television, or movies. The examples provided are just that--examples. Please also note that it is possible for a text to have more than one conflict at work. The repeated references to conflicts in The Simpsons provide further context on how multiple conflicts might be present in a single work. Other examples of conflict are also provided.

List of Literary Techniques
In your analysis, address at least three of the literary techniques (as defined in Chapters 2 and 4) listed in the document Literary Techniques, describing their relationships with the conflict(s)--which provide deeper insight into possible meaning(s) found in literature--you are addressing in your paper.

Assignment Requirements
  • Topic: Your paper must address two of the texts, at least one of the conflicts, and three of the literary techniques as listed in the guidelines.
  • Length: Your paper must be double spaced and 1250 to 1600 words in length (excluding title and references pages).
  • Sources: You must utilize at least two primary sources to support your thesis (including the course text) and at least two scholarly sources from the Ashford University Library (at least four sources in total). You may also use other academic sources acquired from other classes that pertain to the literary theme and/or conflict.
  • Elements of Academic Writing: Please see the Guide to Writing a Compare/Contrast Essay resource, which provides information regarding how to effectively organize this essay.
  • APA: Your assignment must be formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
    • Separate Title Page: Must include a separate title page that lists the following: an original title, your name, date of submission, and the professor’s name.
    • Separate Reference Page: At the end of your paper, include a separate references page that lists all sources utilized for and cited within your analysis.
    • Proper Citations: All sources must be properly cited according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center, both within the text of your paper and on the references page.

Subject English
Due By (Pacific Time) 01/12/2015 12:00 am
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