Project #56092 - Last Humanties

I need two paragraphs for each questioned paragraph. 

 

Claude Monet's painting Impression: Sunrise gave its name to a new artistic style, which emphasized the effects of changes in lighting and of the movement of objects on human perception. What techniques did Monet use to paint a picture less about what people see than about how people see, as the text suggests? Based on this painting, what properties of light and color did Monet seem to understand? Compare this painting with the works of Renoir, Degas, and Cassatt. How do these artists' use of form and light compare to Monet's? How well did Impressionist art capture the human impression of the physical world? Consider Impressionism in the light of nineteenth-century Realist paintings such as Manet's Déjeuner sur l'herbe , Eakins' The Agnew Clinic, and Courbet's Burial at Ornans.

 

Perhaps the most important architectural innovation of the mid-nineteenth century was the use of cast iron. Designers such as Paxton and Eiffel used this material to create grandiose structures that would not be feasible using more traditional materials. Examine the images of their respective works, the Crystal Palace and the Eiffel Tower. What advantages does cast iron have, which these structures use to good effect? What are the weaknesses of cast-iron structures? Is cast iron an aesthetically pleasing material? Compare these structures to the Guaranty Building of Buffalo. Does the emphasis of the Guaranty Building's architecture seem to be on artistry or on practicality?  

 

Poetry can often prove more difficult for readers to appreciate than prose because poems tend to be written in a more elliptical and impressionist manner than prose. Many poets challenge readers by evoking moods and suggesting ideas rather than making concrete statements. Analyze Yeats' landmark poem "The Second Coming”.What is this poem about? What does it describe? What mood does it evoke? What symbols does it use to convey its meaning? Compare this poem to Frost's "The Road Not Taken”.Which poet uses the most concrete imagery? Which poet's images are most obscure? In the case of "The Second Coming," does obliqueness enhance or detract from the meaning of the poem? Which of these three poems is the most “modern"?

 

In the twentieth century, avant-garde artists such as Pablo Picasso abandoned attempts to produce photorealistic images of the natural world or even the less defined impressions made by movement and light. Examine Picasso's famous painting Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (Fig. 14.9). What does this painting suggest about modern views of reality and human perception of it? How does this piece define the shapes of its subjects? What is the effect on the viewer of the rendering of the subjects as composites of simple shapes? Why might some of the figures in the painting be more distorted than others? How does this painting anticipate later Cubist developments, such as Picasso's own Man with a Violin (Fig. 14.12) or Duchamp's Cubist-influenced Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 (Fig. 14.16)? How distinct are these three works from Nonobjective pieces such as Malevich's Suprematist Composition: White on White (Fig. 14.18), Kandinsky's Panel for Edwin Campbell, No. 2 (Fig. 14.1), and Mondrian's Composition with Large Red Plane, Yellow, Black, Gray, and Blue (Fig. 14.19)? Does all modern art succumb to the Dadaists' urge to undermine art and meaning? If not, what meanings are to be found in Nonobjective artwork?

 

 

Structure is an important element of a musical composition. How does John Cage use structure in his famous piece 4' 33" (p 449)? Can this composition be said to consist of anything besides structure? Can this composition be said to constitute a work of art? Compare this piece to Duchamp's Fountain (p. 403). What do Cage and Duchamp both seem to be saying about art and ordinary life? Is their point a valid one? How does the artistic philosophy behind 4' 33" and Fountain compare with Warhol's Pop art (Fig. 15.15)? How do the roles of Cage and Duchamp as artists compare with that of Jackson Pollock (Figs. 15.4-15.5) and other action painters?

 

 

The twentieth-century rejection of prevailing artistic conventions found its expression on stage in the theater of the absurd. Probably the most famous English-language work in this genre is Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot (p. 420), in which two characters await the arrival of a third person, who never shows. Can the action of this play be said to constitute a plot? Can a play have an artistic meaning without a recognizable plot, or is the absence of a standard plotline a meaning in and of itself? Compare the artistic intent behind Waiting for Godot to the works of contemporary artists such as Gwendolyn Brooks. Betye Saar (Fig. 15.7), Barbara Kruger (Fig. 15.10), and Robert Mapplethorpe (Fig. 15.11). Are the intended meanings of these works more or less apparent than the intended meaning of Beckett's play? What does the juxtaposition of these works suggest about the uses of art since the end of the World War II?

 

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Due By (Pacific Time) 02/13/2015 03:00 pm
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