Project #6661 - Works Cited

Simply copy and paste or add a snippet or screen shot from each source in the essay. A finished copy will look similar to the following abbreviated example(below), which lists the work in citation form followed by the section with the sentence or sentences actually quoted in the body of the paper highlighted:

 I am asking you to ONLY include the section or sections you actually quote from, highlighting the sentence or sentences you actually used in the essay. So, you should copy/paste or include the surrounding paragraph or paragraphs for each sentence you include, not just the sentences you cited using quotes in the essay

I need to see the section or sections (not the entire document or article) from which you pulled your quotes. If you choose to upload the entire document or article, that’s fine. You will then need to, in some way, highlight the sentence or sentences you actually quoted in your essay.

EXAMPLE:

Works Cited

Galles, Kristen M. "Filling The Gaps: Women, Civil Rights, And Title IX." Human Rights 3 (2004): 16. JSTOR Arts & Sciences X. Web. 22 Apr. 2013.

Although most people today associate Title IX with athletics, its coverage is and was intended to be far broader. It opened doors for admissions, academic majors, classes, and vocational education. It also mandated equal access and equal treatment once admitted. But the doors did not open overnight.

Soon after its passage, several lawmakers tried to amend or even repeal Title IX. Organizations like the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the College Football Coaches Association strongly opposed its application to athletics or at least to men's "revenue producing" (not profit-producing) sports. Health, Education, and Welfare Secretary Caspar Weinberger defended the law, noting that Title IX had no exclusions for athletics or any other educational program. Nevertheless, for the next several years Congress battled numerous attempts to weaken Title IX and its 1975 regulations. Each attempt failed.

Yet attacks on Title IX continued into the 1980s. Many schools argued that Title IX applied only to educational programs that actually received federal funds and not to all educational programs simply because the schools themselves received general federal monies. Despite extensive, contrary legislative history, the Supreme Court adopted this view in Grove City College v. Bell, 465 U.S. 555 (1984). Another attack came in Atascadero State Hospital v. Scanlon, 473 U.S. 234 (1985), which held that, absent express waiver, state-run institutions were protected by sovereign immunity from monetary damage suits under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (like Title VI, a spending clause sister statute of Title IX). As a result of these two Supreme Court decisions, enforcement activity of all three civil rights statutes virtually ceased.

 

The following file is the list of six sources

Subject English
Due By (Pacific Time) 05/24/2013 02:00 pm
Report DMCA
TutorRating
pallavi

Chat Now!

out of 1971 reviews
More..
amosmm

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
PhyzKyd

Chat Now!

out of 1164 reviews
More..
rajdeep77

Chat Now!

out of 721 reviews
More..
sctys

Chat Now!

out of 1600 reviews
More..
sharadgreen

Chat Now!

out of 770 reviews
More..
topnotcher

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
XXXIAO

Chat Now!

out of 680 reviews
More..
All Rights Reserved. Copyright by AceMyHW.com - Copyright Policy