Project #76113 - Shane Novel

3 pages due 10 hours

As you can see from our readings and discussions, there are a lot of different aspects of Shane to investigate. Choose one element from the novel that you want to learn more about and write a thesis-driven paper on that topic. Remember that you have to take a position in your paper, and that position has to be supported by evidence from the book’s text. Shane is a carefully-written novel, so you should spend some time looking at what characters say and how they say it. Interpreting a character’s words and tone could help support your argument. While you can certainly write about heroism in the novel, you can also branch out and write about other topics and themes that you find interesting.

Your paper should not be a comparison between Joaquin Murieta and Shane. Just focus on Shane in this paper; there will be a comparison paper assignment later in the course. Your paper must be at least 800 words long.

Follow the same submission guidelines for this draft as for the previous draft, but make sure you choose "can edit" from the drop-down menu when you create your sharing link! You will be peer-reviewing each others' papers this time, and this will make your peer editor's life much easier.

Peer reviewing instructions

This paper will be your first peer-review assignment. After you write your draft, you will be randomly assigned another student’s paper to review through Canvas. You will get your peer review assignment on Thursday the 9th, but only if you have already submitted your assignment. If you don’t submit your own draft, you will not be able to complete a peer review. You will be able to access the paper you are peer reviewing in the “To Do” list on your Canvas home page, and also on the Paper 2, Draft 1 assignment page.

To complete the peer review, open the paper you are assigned to review by clicking on the link. The paper should open a Google Documents window inside the Canvas page. Your goal as a peer reviewer is to make suggestions that will help your partner improve their paper, not to re-write the paper for them. For this reason, you want to make sure all of the changes you might make to the document are clearly marked. Go to the top right corner of the screen and click the drop-down arrow next to where it says “Editing” and choose “Suggesting” instead. After you do this, every change you make to the actual text will be clearly marked.

You can make suggestions by typing them in the text of the paper, or by adding marginal comments (select the text you want to comment on, go to the “Insert” tab on the menu, and choose “Comment”). In-text corrections are useful for typos or grammatical problems, while marginal comments are useful for explanations and suggestions. As you are reviewing, think about the kinds of comments you would like to get on your own paper, and do your best to provide that same level of positive help to your partner.

What To Look For

1) Read your partner’s introduction and thesis statement.

  • The beginning of the introduction should pull you in with an interesting idea that is pretty closely related to the topic of the paper.
  • The body of the introduction should lead up to and explain any background necessary to understand the thesis statement.
  • The thesis statement should take a specific position or make a specific claim about the text that could be debated. To find out if a thesis is debatable, try to think of what the opposite position would be. If you are having a hard time with this, try to diagnose the problem. Is the thesis stating the obvious? Is it missing details or specific language that would help you understand the position? Make suggestions that you think would improve the thesis.

2) Read through your partner’s whole paper. Pay special attention to:

  • Topic sentences: each paragraph should start with a sentence that establishes the topic or theme of the paragraph, not a plot or character description. Mark any topic sentences that you think could be stronger.
  • Use of evidence: you should understand each point the author is making. If you are confused or feel like information is missing (either a quote or explanation of a quote), make a note so the author can check that section. Read like a skeptic who needs to be utterly convinced of the paper’s ideas.
  • Coherence: each paragraph should relate clearly to the thesis idea, and each paragraph should move the overall argument forward in an organized way. If you think a paragraph or section is not clearly related to the thesis or seems out of place, make a note.
  • Completeness: the paper should leave you feeling satisfied that the author demonstrated her or his point. If you feel like the author is missing information or an important perspective, or that there is a flaw in their argument that they did not deal with, make a note of it. If you have questions the author didn’t address, let them know. They might to add that information into their paper.

Subject English
Due By (Pacific Time) 07/10/2015 12:00 am
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