Project #76759 - Bible historical understanding

REPLIES to (both Posts) - Kristen Davis & Elisabeth McLamb

·      Look for areas of common ground or diversity between your comments on the prompts and your peers’ finding(s) and engage each other.

·      Connect and comment on areas included or not included in your peers’ posts that you would like to share.

·      Each reply must be at least 100 words composed in 1 paragraph.

 

Kristen Davis – post: 1

It is important that we approach the Bible from a historical-cultural context because it is impossible to have a good understanding of the Scripture without it. We live in a much different world than the one of Bible times, which is another reason that we need to read the Bible with the understanding of how life was back then. If we do not approach the Bible from a historical –cultural context we will often miss the meaning of the part of the Bible we are trying to read. We will not understand what God is trying to show us (Duvall, 2008).

 

Each book of the Bible was written with a certain objective. The book of Leviticus was written to teach the Israelites holiness. The entire book is a series of laws that the Israelites were to follow. In Leviticus 1: 1-5, we learn about the laws of sacrifice, specifically about a bull without blemish. To us in this day and age we might not understand why this is important. We need to approach the passage from a historical-cultural context to understand this concept. Under the Old Testament covenant a burnt sacrifice was given to God to show forgiveness for ones sins. We can interpret this as a way to further understand the holiness of God.

 

I have witnessed many people, and been guilty of it myself, pick apart the Bible to get a certain verse to apply to a certain area of life. While this is great in theory we miss the whole meaning of the verse we tried to use. It could mean something completely different and we could misunderstand what God is trying to teach us through that.

 

References

 

Duvall, J., & Hays, J. (2008). Journey into God's word: Your guide to understanding and applying the Bible. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan.

 

The Holy Bible: NKJV, New King James version. (2011). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

 

 

Elizabeth McLamb – post: 2

When people approach the Bible without any concern for the historical-cultural context, there is great potential for misinterpretations of what the scriptures truly mean. I grew up in charismatic churches. Twenty years ago I saw a preacher use many scriptures out of context. He used the scriptures to prove his point and not show what the bible was saying. Because of this, I saw many people who trusted this Pastor fall away from God for a while and others never come back. I am not blaming this pastor for causing these people to turn from God, They probably had a few underlining issues no one will know about, but it just proves a point that we have to be very careful how we use Gods word.

 

Two scriptures that I chose to show the importance of understanding the historical-cultural context are 1 chronicles 16:22 Saying, “Do not touch my anointed ones, and do my prophets no harm” and Psalms 105:15”Saying, “Do not touch my anointed ones, and do my prophets no harm”.   I chose these two scriptures because they were the first ones that came to mind after being reminded of the particular Pastor I mentioned in my previous paragraph. He would tell the congregation, while speaking from the pulpit, “don’t go against what I am saying to you because I am the Lord’s anointed and you will be cursed.”  He twisted the scripture and used it out of context to make a personal point. Both of those scriptures were songs of victory sung by David, Asaph and his brothers because they brought the Ark of the Covenant into Jerusalem. Clarkes Commentary states, “touch my anointed” meaning the patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) are here intended and also the entire people of Israel. They were a kingdom of priest, prophets, and kings and they were always anointed”.

 

Because we live in an “instant application” society, it does make it difficult to put forth the effort to study the historical-cultural context. I have fallen short of this. All I have to do is type in google “meaning of John 3:16” and I will get a list of studies, commentaries, and meanings. I don’t have to put any effort at all to study the scriptures myself. Before today, I didn’t know how to use a commentary. Now, I am really excited I am learning new tools to understand how to study the bible. There is an adventure in searching meaning and using tools myself then having someone else give me the answer. I find that I understand more when I find my own answers.

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