Project #79599 - Discussion Seven traditional functions of families

This needs to be 1 page with at least 1 apa citing

Based on your opinion, rank the seven traditional functions of families in order of importance. These functions are found on page 362 in your textbook. Functions such as care for the aging, birth rate, and economic production are highlighted. How would you rank these functions in order of importance to our society? Why do you think this primary order is critical? What would happen in society if the order was reversed? How does an economic or structural change potentially rearrange the ordering of these functions? For example, during the Great Depression, millions of Americans would have prioritized economic production over a function such as recreation. Or, consider how procreation might be devalued for a time when a country is experiencing war or social upheaval. This ordering exercise can shed some light on your own values and beliefs as well as socioeconomic status.

Page 362

"Legal Changes. You might be surprised, too, at how difficult it once was to get a divorce. One spouse was required to prove severe abuse or adultery. In New York, where adultery was the only grounds for divorce, witnesses had to testify under oath at a trial that one spouse had committed adultery. As the stigma attached to divorce shrank, laws against divorce relaxed. Today, in most states “incompatibility,” which simply means that two people aren’t getting along, has become adequate grounds for divorce. In many states, couples can work out their own “no-fault” divorce, and judges simply sign the paperwork. In Florida, the couple can sign papers in a lawyer’s office, and they don’t even have to appear in court. Such legal changes have further reduced the stigma attached to divorce, which, in turn, has contributed to the high divorce rate.

Are These Changes Good or Bad? Symbolic interactionists take the position that nothing is good or bad in and of itself. They view “goodness” and “badness” as value judgments that are imposed on people’s behavior. Depending on its assump- tions, one group is alarmed at increases in divorce and changes in marital roles, new views on parenting, and so on. Another group looks at these same changes and feels pleased that the family is evolving. Symbolic interactionists do not take a stand that either is correct or better, for symbolic interactionism has no framework for making value judgments.

In Sum â–¸ To explain why the divorce rate has increased, symbolic interactionists ana- lyze how symbols—ideas, meanings, and expectations—associated with marriage and family life have changed. They stress that symbols both reflect and create reality. That is, symbols not only represent people’s ideas but also influence people’s ideas and behaviors.

Functionalism: Declining Functions

When functionalists analyze social change, they look at how change in one part of soci- ety affects its other parts. Earlier in this chapter, we examined the impact of industrial- ization and urbanization on marriage and family. You will recall that the birthrate fell as children became more costly. This is an example of how change in one part of the system (work) brought about change in another (family). Let’s look now at how func- tionalists explain our high rate of divorce.

For background, we should note that functionalists have identified seven key func- tions of the family. They point out that around the world the family provides

1. economic production 2. socialization of children 3. care of the sick and injured 4. care of the aged 5. recreation 6. sexual control of family members 7. reproduction.

Let’s see what effects the Industrial Revolution and urbanization had on these seven traditional functions of the family—and how a reduction of these functions are related to divorce.

Economic Production. Before industrialization, the members of a family worked together as an economic team. Survival was precarious. Even getting enough food and adequate clothing was a problem. To survive, the members of a family—like it or not— were forced to cooperate. When industrialization moved production from home to factory, it disrupted this team. No longer working as a unit, the husband-father was separated from the daily activities of the family and the wife-mother from the production of income. The older children, who went to work for wages, grew less dependent on their family."

 (Henslin 362)

 

Henslin, James M. Social Problems: A Down to Earth Approach, 11th Edition. Pearson, 2014. VitalBook file.

 

 

The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

 

Subject General
Due By (Pacific Time) 08/18/2015 09:00 pm
Report DMCA
TutorRating
pallavi

Chat Now!

out of 1971 reviews
More..
amosmm

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
PhyzKyd

Chat Now!

out of 1164 reviews
More..
rajdeep77

Chat Now!

out of 721 reviews
More..
sctys

Chat Now!

out of 1600 reviews
More..
sharadgreen

Chat Now!

out of 770 reviews
More..
topnotcher

Chat Now!

out of 766 reviews
More..
XXXIAO

Chat Now!

out of 680 reviews
More..
All Rights Reserved. Copyright by AceMyHW.com - Copyright Policy