Project #83851 - Global Scientific Revolution - Reply to Student

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 “China, more than any other country in Asia, was the subject of a a determined attempt by Westerners to promote Western scientific ideas.” (p.145) They were targeted by the Jesuits. The Jesuits followed Ptolemaic, thenTychonic astronomy, and physics based on Aristotle. The Jesuits wanted to show the Chinese the importance of advancement of science from the West. They focused on mathematics and astronomy. They anticipated that the growth and development of Western Science would attract them, and eventually lead them to the Christian faith. One object of interest to China was the mathematical aspect to astronomy, and the ability to predict astronomical events. During this reform the Chinese felt it was necessary to reconstruct their calendar. As science developed, the Jesuits left their belief in Ptolemaic system for the Tychonianism but didn’t advance their practices to follow that of Copernicamismuntil the late eighteenth century. This historical divergent lead the Jesuits to fall behind in scientific advancement and kept their numbers of followers small. During the sixteenth and seventeenth century, Qing Emperor Kangxi was being taught the practices and beliefs of the Jesuits. He believed that the studies of science would “aid in the rule of the Empire.”

Mei Wending, an astronomer in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century, was convinced that the advancement in mathematics were from Chinese origin. He felt the need to re exam their mathematical system and tried to prove that it did not originate in the west, but rather in China.

            Christian Missionaries were very prevalent in India, but did not have such an impact on India’s society as it tried to have in China. India was “ruled by the Moguls, A Muslim dynasty of Central Asia.” William Burns, The Scientific revolution in Global Perspective. “The greatest evidence of interest in Western science in early modern India was the observatory of the Hindu prince Jai Singh II (1688-1743)” William Burns, The Scientific revolution in Global Perspective. “His observatories brought together indigenous Indian, Islamic, and Western astronomers” William Burns, The Scientific revolution in Global Perspective. Despite the European influences, prince Jai Singh II kept in line with Indian and Islamic traditions and followings.

“like the Chinese Bureau of Astronomy, Jai Singh was also isolated from the most modern astronomy by the fact that the European astronomers he worked with were catholic Jesuits educated in the anit-Corpernican traditions.” William Burns, The Scientific revolution in Global Perspective.

During the time of the scientific revolution, in the western world, people had a difficult time accepting the advancement in diverse science because there were explanations to the natural world that they believed argued with the idea of God’s divine plan. As you can see China and India had their own interest in scientific advancement, but because the Jesuits had underlining ideas of spreading Christianity, it kept peoples progress timid for a time.

Subject Science
Due By (Pacific Time) 09/27/2015 11:00 pm
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