Project #85838 - Psychology

Write an essay on Social Psychology 200 words.

In addition write a brief summary (100-200 words) and your thoughts on the following statement: 

 Social Psychology was my favorite class in which I participated at Notre Dame.Needless to say, the Stanford Prison Experiment has always captivated me since first reading of its accounts and revelations.This experiment addressed the psychology of incarceration and its terrible consequences.Philip Zimbardo wanted to test his conviction that the environment around any group of individuals frequently controls how individuals will conduct themselves more significantly than their temperamental personality(Hock, 2013).According to Zimbardo, even though we may have certain intrinsic social inclinations, potent circumstances can overwhelm those and lead us to participate in actions that are unlike our typical selves (Hock, 2013).Once Zimbardo created the false prison atmosphere, the prisoners and guards began to internalize their roles significantly.The guards and prisoners adjusted to their roles more than Zimbardo anticipated, overstepping forecasted restrictions and limitations, triggering hazardous and psychologically destructive scenarios. Many of the guards were deemed to have displayed merciless and appalling propensities, while many inmates were psychologically devastated; with some being eliminated from the experiment ahead of time. After Zimbardo realized that he had been inertly permitting immoral behaviors to be carried under his supervision, he decided that both prisoners and guards had become unacceptably engrossed in their characters and he sacked the experiment (Hock, 2013). Zimbardo was also stunned by his own personal transformation into prison superintendent.He took note on how he began to walk and talk like a rigid institutional authority figure who was more concerned about the security of the prison than the needs of those who were participating in the research (Hock, 2013).Approximately 12 years earlier, Stanley Milgram orchestrated a controversial experiment also investigating behavior, role play, and obedience. This experiment measured the inclination of contributors to comply with a leader who directed them to execute acts contradictory with their personal ethics and integrity(Hock, 2013). The participants thought that for each incorrect reply, the other participant was receiving electric shocks. In truth, there were no shocks. After several voltage intensifications, the actor started to make a commotion on the other side of the wall barrier.Even if the participants were reluctant to move forward, they were instructed to do so by the leader.Almost 2/3 of the participants administered the highest shock wave to the learner according to Milgram (Hock, 2013).Both Zimbardo's and Milgram's experiments came years before the embarrassing events of the prison of Abu Ghraib, where American soldiers were photographed torturing and abusing imprisoned detainees.One has to contemplate the correlations between the two scientists' initial assertions regarding obedience and conformity and the events at Abu Ghraib.Finally, the third concept addressed in this week's readings focused on the events of 1964 when Kitty Genovese was murdered in a Queens neighborhood while 38 people in the neighborhood heard the attack and witnessed it, but did not intervene with any sort of assistance.If someone had acted to help Genovese, she may have survived the attack. John Darley and Bibb Latane illustrate through experimentation that social influence played a major role in the decision process for the onlookers of this crime.This is something they refer to as the "diffusion of responsibility.” This states that the more people present witnessing an injustice, the less responsibility is assumed by the individuals to take action (Hock, 2013). There is essentially an assumption that "someone else will step up” when there is a large crowd of onlookers present.Another reason for witness apprehension to intervene is the potential for ridicule or embarrassment. They contend that the thought of helping others carries with it the possibility of looking foolish if others do not want or need the help (Hock, 2013).

ReferencesHock, R. R. (2013). A prision by any other name... In R. R. Hock, Forty studies that changed psychology: Explorations into the history of psychological research(pp. 285-292). Boston: Pearson.

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Due By (Pacific Time) 10/08/2015 04:00 pm
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