Project #89497 - Forum & Responses

The initial post of at least 250 words with proper citation and reference then compose at least three responses (125 words or more) to 3 classmates using specific examples:

initial post:

What was the purpose of the 14th Amendment? How was this different/similar from the Fifteenth Amendment? What was the impact of these Amendments during Reconstruction. What was their impact in more recent history?

Responses:

 

The purpose of the 14th amendment was to make all people of the US born or that was brought over in the past for slavery citizens. This amendment was supposed to make everyone legal in the US with equal rights when it comes to laws and life for people. With the African Americans being free this amendment was supposed to be for them as well, but that wasn’t the case when it came to them. The 15th amendment was to grant all African Americans the right to vote, but when you read and look into the 14th amendment that right to them was already granted. The 15th amendment had to be created because of the way white Americans treated the blacks during certain laws and political issues. See the 15th amendment should have never been made because of the 14th amendment, but the white Americans were so hateful that they would find ways around the amendment to not allow Africans the right to vote. So the 15th amendment had to be made specifically for African Americans stating that they have the right as well as whites to vote on political offices. Now at first the African Americans were getting their votes thrown out and not counted down south because the Whites still did not respect the blacks no matter how many laws they made for them. The whites did not see blacks as equal in no shape or form, and they felt that blacks should have no say so on what goes on with the countries government and how it is ran.
 

Many of black and white Republican leaders favored increasing the authority of state governments to promote the welfare of all the state's citizens. Before the Civil War, most southern states did not provide schools, medical care, assistance for the mentally impaired, or prisons. Such concerns, if attended to at all, were left to local communities or families.

Black leaders were eager to increase literacy and promote education among black people. Republicans created statewide systems of public education throughout the South. It seem to be a difficult and expensive task, and the results were only a limited success. Schools had to be built, teachers employed, and textbooks provided. In order to pay for it, taxes were increased in the states still reeling from the war. Some black leaders favored a poll tax on voting to fund the school. Thus, although Reconstruction leaders established a strong commitment to public education, the results they achieved were uneven. Reconstruction leaders also supported higher education. In 1872, Mississippi legislators took advantage of the 1862 federal Morrill Land-Grant Act, which provided states with funds for agricultural and mechanical colleges to found the first historically black state university: Alcorn A&M College. Even though the university was named after white Republican Governor James L. Alcorn, former U.S. Senator Hiram Revels was it first president. (pg.329)

Black Leader's determination to open public facilities to all people revealed deep divisions between themselves and whit Republicans. In several southern states they introduced bills to prevent proprietors from excluding black people from restaurants, bathrooms,hotels, concert halls, and auditoriums, along with railroads coaches, streetcars, and steamboats.

Republicans established a Reconstruction program to disfranchise key southern leaders while providing legal rights to freedmen. The right to vote, they reasoned, would enable black people to deal more effectively with white southerners and strengthen the Republican Party in the South. (pg. 317)

 

James

 

Works Cited

The African-American Odyssey: Volume 1, Fifth Edition, by Darlene Clark Hine, William C. Hine, and Stanley Harrold. Published by Prentice Hall. Copyright 2011 by Pearson Education, Inc.

 

The Reconstruction period was supposed to be exactly what it says, to rebuild and restore order to the United States. The period was supposed heal the country because the Civil War obviously tore it apart. While legislation was passed to abolish slavery (13th Amendment) the southern states still enacted policies that mistreated black people. Although the war was over anger remained and was prevalent throughout the south. For example in the south according to our text, “White people imposed sever restrictions on freedmen including children.” Moreover, the restrictions were more about controlling black people and their socioeconomic status. The terms which these restrictions were deemed were black codes. It is no secret that black people after slavery wanted land. In all honesty they had tended to the land of their masters for years. They had grown crops such as sugarcane, tobacco, indigo, cotton, etc. Black Americans were well versed in agriculture. Again, the black codes made it almost impossible for black Americans to acquire land. For example, “the black codes ensured the agricultural labor was controlled by white people.” Even though slavery was abolished black Americans had no idea how their struggles were not over but only beginning.

The Reconstruction period gave rise to prejudice and racial tension. The Ku Klux Klan was a group of people who promoted white supremacy and were anti-black. The Klan and their supporters perpetuated violence and dominance over black people terrorizing them at any cost without any regard for the law. The Klan was made up of former confederate soldiers and most of them were also apart of local law enforcement. Unfortunately, this was a lose, lose situation for newly freed black Americans. Furthermore, the period of Reconstruction gave rise to the most lynching’s that occurred in the United States.  According to the website EJI they have documented “3,959 lynching’s in twelve states alone, from Reconstruction until the 1950’s.”  The terror by the Ku Klux Klan and other home grown militia’s made the healing process of Reconstruction difficult for black Americans.

 

Reference:

http://www.eji.org/files/EJI%20Lynching%20in%20America%20SUMMARY.pdf

The African-American Odyssey: Volume 1, Fifth Edition, by Darlene Clark Hine, William C. Hine, and Stanley Harrold. Published by Prentice Hall. Copyright © 2011 by Pearson Education, Inc.

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