Project #90494 - Disscusion Board

Read three students reports (about a 1,000 words each). Then write 100 word responses for all three both, super easy wouldnt take more than a hour just dont have the time a need done today. each response will need a word count

#1 (Lindsay Cash) I disagree with the statement that "the way income and wealth inequality has changed over the past decades in the United States today is beneficial for our individual citizens as well as serving the greater good of our American Society". One of the articles says that in 1928 the top 1% reported 23.9% of all income, while in 2005 the top 10% reported 48.5%. (Income Gap is Widening, Data Shows). This sounds pretty accurate with how the gap in income is changing from poverty, middle class, rich, to poverty or rich. On the other end of the income line, another article explains that 40-54% of Americans between 25 and 60 will experience life near or below the poverty line for at least a year. (Poverty In America). I feel like in America, there are more and more families living like Lisa Land does. She lives with her father, whom she cares for. She uses his $1,300 to live, while her adult daughter helps with groceries (Middle Class Shrinks Further As More Fall Out Instead Of Climbing Up). As for how I would change the system so that children of the upper, middle, working, and lower class families had equal chances would be first and foremost, I would make higher education either free, or much less than it is now. I live with both my parents, my brother (who is also in college at Pierce), and my grandfather. My brothers tuition is paid for by his high school. My grandpa helps out to pay for anything we need. My parents can't hardly get through the month because of bills. Sometimes we have to not spend as much on food, because bills are so expensive. I pay for tuition out of my own pocket. I don't qualify for financial aid, and my parents have no money. So I have to pay for myself. If college was free, I could get a part time job and help my parents, while bettering my future. Education is key in how successful you are. I don't think any family should have to live, scraping by, barely making it, not qualifying for assistance. Just because you make a certain amount, doesn't mean you can afford things. People want higher minimum wage, but with higher wages, comes a higher cost of living. Making tuition free or even half of what it is now, I believe would make so many more people go to college to benefit them and their families. I also agree with the statement that the poverty rate is about twice of that of the European Average. By having universal health care, affordable child care, and reasonably low-priced housing, I think the poverty level would become less than what it is now. America is so fixated on becoming richer, while not seeing the affects on families, health, quality of health care, food, and life, and so on. I do not think that lack of motivation, failure to work, or poor decisions contribute to poverty (Poverty in America Is Mainstream) I know many people in the poverty level who work hard and have worked hard. I can understand certain circumstances where someone gets into drugs or really does simply lack motivation and fail to work. I think for most families, parents work really hard to provide for their children and simply can’t anymore. In one of the articles, it says that high income families increased the amount they spent on enrichment activities for their children grew by 150%, while low income families grew by 57% over the same period of time. If you have no money to start with, how can you increase your spending on enrichment activities for your children. Another way I would change things would be to help those in the poverty stricken schools. Targeting children while they are young, to give them the things they need in life to grow, not just in education, but in life as well. Instead of giving money to the schools that do really well and show amazing test scores, if you gave the money to schools with low income students, you could give those kids the supplies and resources they need to better their education. #2 (Sarah Hagedorn) When considering the statement, "the way income and wealth inequality has changed over the past decades in the Unites States today is beneficial to our individual citizens as well as serving the greater good of our American Society", I cant help but disagree with it. I believe that the way things have changed they have only gotten worse for the people who are lower class, and have only gotten better for the people who are upper class. "...poverty is a mainstream event experienced by a majority of Americans. For most of us, the question is not whether we will experience poverty, but when" (Rank, paragraph 6). Poverty is not something that is going away for most of us. It is not something that we can escape from. I believe that it is not serving the greater good when the gap is still as large as it is. I do not believe that anyone who works a full time job should still suffer to pay their bills and survive. I think this changes when children are put into the picture. You cannot simply work at fast food for the rest of your life and expect to fully support your own needs as well as those of your children. Because of the people that chose not to go better their lives, affect those of their children. Maybe it is not done on purpose but it is something that happens inevitably. "In a more recent study, my graduate students and I found that 15 percent of high-income students from the high school class of 2004 enrolled in a highly selective college or university, while fewer than 5 percent of middle-income and 2 percent of low-income students did" (Reardon, paragraph 8). Referring to the above statement, maybe this is not something that a lot of people can help, when you are born into a family who only know how to live in a certain way or manner, you are not taught the resources to go to school and better the life you have for yourself. As for myself, I was not aware of the things I could have done straight out of high school, I know that I got to my education now and I am happy that I did. But I only wish that I would have had the push and resources to go sooner. If I were "in charge", I think one of my largest priorities would be to make sure that the children are always taken care of and given the most opportunity for the brightest future that they possibly could have. I know that they adults are just as important, so I would also try and get them the resources that they need to better themselves and also to be able to teach their children what is available to them. To make the children of the Upper, Middle, Working, and Lower class have equal chances to participate in success, I think that I would have a large amount of scholarship and grant money. I would not only give them to further education, but to advance them in sports and clubs and things that will interact them with the world around them. I know that there will always be people with more drive then others, and there will always be somewhat of a gap to success. But if everyone is given the same chance to pursue their dreams then at least we could all know that we did our best. I also think that it is never to late to get back into the game and change what you have in front of you into something better. The ways that we all get comfortable and stuck in our ways can inhibit us from doing something better that could make us more successful. Providing new opportunities to learn new skills for people in poverty would be offered if I were in charge. "Still, there are some recent signs of hope for the middle class. The economy is improving and more jobs are being created, many of them in better-paying categories like professional services, health care and even a reviving manufacturing sector." (Searcey and Gebeloff). If people were more aware of the higher paying jobs, and were able to get the education for them there would be less poverty and better lives. This could even help the people whoa re middle-aged and want a new job in life to help support the kids and their spouse. Opportunities are everywhere, and if I were "in charge", everyone would have a chance to grasp one. #3 (Ashley Ward) I disagree with the statement of "The way income and wealth inequality (stratification) has changed over the past decades in the United States today is beneficial for our individual citizens as well as serving the greater good of our American Society.” The textbook and the five articles support my position in disagreeing that during the past decades these changes are not beneficial, nor do they serve the greater good of American Society. Equally important, the benefits for individual citizens’ income, wealth, and inequality does not provide any beneficial factors for our individual citizens, as well as the greater good of our American society. The textbook provides a vivid picture of income and wealth inequality, and also highlights information on distribution of property and income. Overall, Americans are worth a hefty sum however, the wealthiest 10 percent of Americans own 70 percent of the nation’s wealth. Additionally, if we look at figure 7.6 – on page 203 of the textbook – noticeably, there has been very little change in distribution of income through the years. Secondly, if we look at how income inequality decreased from 1935 to 1970; As the textbook points out, since 1970 the richest 20 percent of U.S. families have grown richer, while the poorest 20 percent have grown poor. Furthermore, despite numerous government antipoverty programs, the poorest 20 percent of Americans receive less of the nation’s income today than they did decades ago. In contrast, the richest 20 percent are receiving more, as they did in 1935. How can such a large gap in income and wealth inequality be beneficial for our society if the rich are continuing to get richer, and the poorer becoming poorer? What are the benefits of this stratification? Well, let’s look at Kingsley Davis and Wilbert Moore, two functionalists, who concluded that stratification of society is inevitable because: 1.Some of a society’s positions are more important than others. 2.The more important positions must be filled by the more qualified people. 3.To motivate the more qualified people to fill these positions, they carry greater rewards. According to Davis and Moore, in our text, the more demanding and accountable positions offer greater rewards. To sustain their point they used the following example: to get highly qualified people to compete with one another some positions offer two million a year and other amenities. Well, less demanding positions, a $30,000 salary without benefits is enough to get hundreds of people to compete. This is where I partially agree with the original statement made above. One benefit from the income and wealth inequality is the motivation to compete for better paying jobs. However, as Melvin Tumin pointed out the arguments made by Davis and Moore have three flaws. Those flaws are first, how do we know that the positions that offer the higher reward are more important, second, under Davis and Moore’s described society, society would work as a meritocracy and third if social stratification is functional if would benefit almost everyone. As the article Poverty in America Is Mainstream by Mark Rank, states the percentage of the population that directly encounters poverty is exceedingly high. Mark’s research indicates that nearly 40 percent of Americans between the ages of 25 and 60 will experience at least one year below the official poverty line during that period and 54 percent will spend a year in poverty or near poverty (below 150 percent of the poverty line). But why do we experience poverty? The United States does little to nothing to provide assistance to the poor. As the article stated, the U.S. currently expends the fewest resources within the industrialized countries in terms of pulling families out of poverty and protecting them from falling into it. Furthermore, many people have stereotypes of how one becomes poor. Those stereotypes usually include a lack of motivation, poor work ethic, and bad decision making, however, those stereotypes are not always the case for determining why a person is poor. For example, the article, Middle Class Shrinks Further as More Fall Out Instead of Climbing Up, by Dionne Searchy, showed through the use of several examples how Americans who were in the middle class are now living in poverty. Lisa Land, 49, is one such example. Ms. Land was laid off in 2008 after 13 years at a textile factory in Eden, N.C. Ms. Land, now lives and cares for her father Ray, 88. As we can see from Lisa’s story, the typical stereotypes of poverty do not apply to everyone. Nevertheless, poverty is ultimately a result of failings at economic and political levels rather than individual shortcomings. To support this claim, I refer to the three types of social mobility in the textbook, specifically focusing on downward social mobility. By definition downward social mobility is movement down the social class ladder. Referring back to Ms. Land’s case we see how she experienced downward social mobility. Ms. Land’s downward social mobility was not due to one of the previous mentioned stereotypes of poverty, but due to the failings at the economic and political levels. These failings are representative of the power elite- C. Wright Mills term for the top people in U.S. corporations, military, and politics who make the nation’s major decisions. The failings of the power elite directly impact the Upper Middle, Lower Middle, Working Class, and the Working Poor as indicated in the article, Middle Class Shrinks Further as More Fall Out Instead of Climbing Up. Those in the power elite are the main beneficiaries of the income and wealth inequality. They do not experience the different types of social mobility, or poverty that the average American will experience. Thus contradicting the claim made in the original statement that the income and wealth inequality is beneficial to individual citizens as well as serving the greater good of American society. Furthermore, in the United States over the last few decades differences in educational success between high- and lower-income students have grown substantially. According to the article, No Rich Child Left Behind, by Sean F. Reardon, families of the rich and wealthy, are focusing their resources on their children’s cognitive development and educational success. In contrast, this finding is not a representation of the middle and lower class families not doing enough to ensure their child’s cognitive development and educational success, but a representation of how the income and wealth inequality has affected educational success. With a college degree becoming insufficient to earning a high paying job parents are investing more in their child’s cognitive development from early ages. However, the rising cost of higher education is pricing the middle class out of college. Therefore, providing another example of how the income and wealth inequality is not beneficial to American society. Thus from all the information I’ve read and stated above, I believe that the inequality of income and wealth has not provided any benefits for our individual citizens or the greater good of American society. Question #3 The way that I would redesign the effort/reward system so that children of the Upper, Middle, and Lower classes families all had equal chances to participate in socio-economic competition for success is by increasing the taxes on the wealthy, providing universal health care, affordable child care, and reasonable priced low-income housing. The increased taxes on the wealthy would go to funding affordable child care, universal health care, and low-income housing. Many Americans have the difficulty of deciding between saving for their child's future, having health care, and providing a sustainable place to live. As an human being, I don't feel I or anyone should have to compromise their children's future due to the astronomical high rates of health care, child care, and housing. By implementing the changes I stated earlier, I believe we could decrease the U.S. poverty rates, which in turn would help decrease the income and wealth inequality.

Subject Science
Due By (Pacific Time) 11/01/2015 07:00 pm
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